Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

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Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Dale-46
Howdy,

I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?

Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
other large corps run it that we know of?

I googled a bit but couldn't find anything.  Maybe my search terms
wasn't good enough.

Links would be nice.

Dale

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Rafa Griman
Hi !!

On Thu, Mar 14, 2013 at 9:15 AM, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Howdy,
>
> I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
> compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
> to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?


First things first ... What do you mean by "speed". Benchmarking is a
very complicated job ;) Do you mean boot time, network bandwidth, HDD
bandwidth, number crunching, graphics, ...? What application(s)? What
data volume? ...

MHO: never trust benchmarks unless you do them and you know what you
are doing ;) Even then ... be careful ;)

If you decide to run some benchmarks, take into account that Gentoo
has so many USE flags ... youo might not use one of those flags ...
but the other distros do use them. Same applies to compiler flags so
... would it be a fair comparison ? ;)

Last, but not least ... Imagine Gentoo is "faster" ... would compile
time be worth it? IOW: installing a precompiled distro (like RHEL,
SLES, ...) can about 30 - 60 minutes. Gentoo can take 24 hours (or
more ... or less, depending on what you install, your experience,
...). Now imagine speed up is 0.1% ... is it worth it?


> Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
> other large corps run it that we know of?


Sorry, can't be of any help here :(


> I googled a bit but couldn't find anything.  Maybe my search terms
> wasn't good enough.
>
> Links would be nice.


MHO

   Rafa

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Neil Bothwick
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 03:15:36 -0500, Dale wrote:

> I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
> compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
> to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?

Mandrake? Where have you been for the last ten years, Dale? ;)


--
Neil Bothwick

... "I just forgot to increment the counter," Tom said, nonplussed.

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Dale-46
Neil Bothwick wrote:
> On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 03:15:36 -0500, Dale wrote:
>
>> I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
>> compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
>> to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?
>
> Mandrake? Where have you been for the last ten years, Dale? ;)
>
>



Sorry, it was called Mandrake when I used it last.  It's Mandriva now.  Odd, it was about 10 years ago that I switched to Gentoo from Mandrake.  That 9.1 to 9.2 upgrade was awful.

Dale

:-)  :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

William Kenworthy
In reply to this post by Dale-46
Did this few years back for an online magazine sponsored by a local
linux sysadmin company who wanted to see the difference between generic
debian and optimised (not necessarily gentoo, but thats what I used.)

Difference in times was ~10% across the board for graphics manipulations
(gimp scripts), spreadsheet tasks (gnumeric) and the like.

The "kicker" - simple optimisations gained far, far more than generic
compiler settings.  e.g., initially, the gnumeric versions were slightly
different, with some wild times across the tasks.  Make em the same
version (and cuedos to the gnumeric maintainer for jumping in and
helping diagnose/fix the problem - newer version on gentoo was heaps
slower :) and there was little difference.

Shared libs like glibc didnt make a huge difference, but being smart
about how/what a "particular" task was handled gained more.  If a debian
app was compiled with similar options as to gentoo, little difference
between them in performance which considering shared libs etc wasn't
what I expected.

The intel compilers are/were said to be a lot better than gcc, not sure
if the gap is still there (supposedly 20% better again)

Its how long is a piece of string kind of question if considered OS
wide, but pick a narrow task and optimise away with smart programmers
and you will do well on almost anything.

Big advantage of gentoo - configurability, version control (what version
is installed and changing it at short notice) and general flexibility.

10 % on software is a lot better than forking out $$$ on faster hardware
to do that (as gamers do!), but at the end of the day, I can also make
my car go faster by painting the diff red (urban myth/joke from my
hotrodding days:) and see roughly the same performance boost - i.e.,
probably wont notice it in real life)

BillK



On 14/03/13 16:15, Dale wrote:

> Howdy,
>
> I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
> compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
> to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?
>
> Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
> other large corps run it that we know of?
>
> I googled a bit but couldn't find anything.  Maybe my search terms
> wasn't good enough.
>
> Links would be nice.
>
> Dale
>


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Michael Hampicke-5
In reply to this post by Dale-46
2013/3/14 Dale <[hidden email]>
Howdy,

Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
other large corps run it that we know of?

I googled a bit but couldn't find anything.  Maybe my search terms
wasn't good enough.

Yeehaw,

domainfactory (http://df.eu) uses a modified version of gentoo on their servers. df is one of the largest domain/hosting/mail providers in german-speaking countries.
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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Mark David Dumlao-3
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On 03/14/2013 04:15 PM, Dale wrote:
Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
other large corps run it that we know of? 

What exactly does it mean to run a "modified version of Gentoo"? Don't we all? ;)
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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Francisco Ares
In reply to this post by Michael Hampicke-5
Hi

Just my  $0.02:

Of course there are distro-related issues on performance, but once the system is up and running, wouldn't it be a matter of compiler/linker optimization differences?

Francisco

2013/3/14 Michael Hampicke <[hidden email]>
2013/3/14 Dale <[hidden email]>
Howdy,

Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
other large corps run it that we know of?

I googled a bit but couldn't find anything.  Maybe my search terms
wasn't good enough.

Yeehaw,

domainfactory (http://df.eu) uses a modified version of gentoo on their servers. df is one of the largest domain/hosting/mail providers in german-speaking countries.



--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have one idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw
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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Alan McKinnon-2
In reply to this post by Mark David Dumlao-3
On 14/03/2013 13:29, Mark David Dumlao wrote:
> On 03/14/2013 04:15 PM, Dale wrote:
>> Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
>> other large corps run it that we know of?
>>
> What exactly does it mean to run a "modified version of Gentoo"? Don't
> we all? ;)


I've always claimed to colleagues that there is no such thing as
"a running Gentoo".

There's an AlanOS, and a DaleOS and a MarkOS and they are all forks of
Gentoo, but nobody actually ever runs "Gentoo"

:-)


--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Pandu Poluan


On Mar 14, 2013 6:39 PM, "Alan McKinnon" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On 14/03/2013 13:29, Mark David Dumlao wrote:
> > On 03/14/2013 04:15 PM, Dale wrote:
> >> Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
> >> other large corps run it that we know of?
> >>
> > What exactly does it mean to run a "modified version of Gentoo"? Don't
> > we all? ;)
>
>
> I've always claimed to colleagues that there is no such thing as
> "a running Gentoo".
>
> There's an AlanOS, and a DaleOS and a MarkOS and they are all forks of
> Gentoo, but nobody actually ever runs "Gentoo"
>
> :-)
>

LOL... that's why I got into the habit of saying "Gentoo-based system" :-)

Rgds,
--

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Pandu Poluan
In reply to this post by William Kenworthy


On Mar 14, 2013 4:14 PM, "William Kenworthy" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Did this few years back for an online magazine sponsored by a local
> linux sysadmin company who wanted to see the difference between generic
> debian and optimised (not necessarily gentoo, but thats what I used.)
>
> Difference in times was ~10% across the board for graphics manipulations
> (gimp scripts), spreadsheet tasks (gnumeric) and the like.
>
> The "kicker" - simple optimisations gained far, far more than generic
> compiler settings.  e.g., initially, the gnumeric versions were slightly
> different, with some wild times across the tasks.  Make em the same
> version (and cuedos to the gnumeric maintainer for jumping in and
> helping diagnose/fix the problem - newer version on gentoo was heaps
> slower :) and there was little difference.
>
> Shared libs like glibc didnt make a huge difference, but being smart
> about how/what a "particular" task was handled gained more.  If a debian
> app was compiled with similar options as to gentoo, little difference
> between them in performance which considering shared libs etc wasn't
> what I expected.
>
> The intel compilers are/were said to be a lot better than gcc, not sure
> if the gap is still there (supposedly 20% better again)
>
> Its how long is a piece of string kind of question if considered OS
> wide, but pick a narrow task and optimise away with smart programmers
> and you will do well on almost anything.
>
> Big advantage of gentoo - configurability, version control (what version
> is installed and changing it at short notice) and general flexibility.
>

This.

Why I prefer Gentoo over other distros: Full control.

I mean, I can (and do) leverage "-march=native". And I certainly have an overly long USE flags... but it's the sheet satisfaction of knowing that my system is MY system that made me stick with Gentoo...

It's eminently satisfying -- a geekgasm, if you will -- to know that one's kernel is lean and customized, all the toolchains have been tuned, and there are no useless things being installed...

In regards to performance, the benefits might not be groundbreaking, but it's there, and when your server is being relentlessly hammered by requests, Gentoo seems to have additional breathing space where other distros choke...

Rgds,
--

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Mark David Dumlao-3
In reply to this post by Alan McKinnon-2
On 03/14/2013 07:36 PM, Alan McKinnon wrote:
On 14/03/2013 13:29, Mark David Dumlao wrote:
On 03/14/2013 04:15 PM, Dale wrote:
Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
other large corps run it that we know of? 

What exactly does it mean to run a "modified version of Gentoo"? Don't
we all? ;)

I've always claimed to colleagues that there is no such thing as
"a running Gentoo".

There's an AlanOS, and a DaleOS and a MarkOS and they are all forks of
Gentoo, but nobody actually ever runs "Gentoo"

:-)
Smart call that you called it a "running" Gentoo rather than an "installed" one, because my followup question would have been, "Well what exactly does it mean to have installed Gentoo? I've had this laptop two years now and I'm still not done tinkering with it!" ;)
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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Alan McKinnon-2
On 14/03/2013 14:31, Mark David Dumlao wrote:

> On 03/14/2013 07:36 PM, Alan McKinnon wrote:
>> On 14/03/2013 13:29, Mark David Dumlao wrote:
>>> On 03/14/2013 04:15 PM, Dale wrote:
>>>> Also, I read that Nasdaq runs a modified version of Gentoo.  Do any
>>>> other large corps run it that we know of?
>>>>
>>> What exactly does it mean to run a "modified version of Gentoo"? Don't
>>> we all? ;)
>>
>> I've always claimed to colleagues that there is no such thing as
>> "a running Gentoo".
>>
>> There's an AlanOS, and a DaleOS and a MarkOS and they are all forks of
>> Gentoo, but nobody actually ever runs "Gentoo"
>>
>> :-)
> Smart call that you called it a "running" Gentoo rather than an
> "installed" one, because my followup question would have been, "Well
> what exactly does it mean to have installed Gentoo? I've had this laptop
> two years now and I'm still not done tinkering with it!" ;)


This is my fifth Dell laptop in a row with Gentoo installed. Tinkering?
yeah I do that too :-)

Some days this system looks like one of those crazy Wily E. Coyote
machines with all the bits I bolt on the back :-)



--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Alan McKinnon-2
In reply to this post by Pandu Poluan
On 14/03/2013 14:12, Pandu Poluan wrote:

>
> On Mar 14, 2013 4:14 PM, "William Kenworthy" <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>> Did this few years back for an online magazine sponsored by a local
>> linux sysadmin company who wanted to see the difference between generic
>> debian and optimised (not necessarily gentoo, but thats what I used.)
>>
>> Difference in times was ~10% across the board for graphics manipulations
>> (gimp scripts), spreadsheet tasks (gnumeric) and the like.
>>
>> The "kicker" - simple optimisations gained far, far more than generic
>> compiler settings.  e.g., initially, the gnumeric versions were slightly
>> different, with some wild times across the tasks.  Make em the same
>> version (and cuedos to the gnumeric maintainer for jumping in and
>> helping diagnose/fix the problem - newer version on gentoo was heaps
>> slower :) and there was little difference.
>>
>> Shared libs like glibc didnt make a huge difference, but being smart
>> about how/what a "particular" task was handled gained more.  If a debian
>> app was compiled with similar options as to gentoo, little difference
>> between them in performance which considering shared libs etc wasn't
>> what I expected.
>>
>> The intel compilers are/were said to be a lot better than gcc, not sure
>> if the gap is still there (supposedly 20% better again)
>>
>> Its how long is a piece of string kind of question if considered OS
>> wide, but pick a narrow task and optimise away with smart programmers
>> and you will do well on almost anything.
>>
>> Big advantage of gentoo - configurability, version control (what version
>> is installed and changing it at short notice) and general flexibility.
>>
>
> This.
>
> Why I prefer Gentoo over other distros: Full control.
>
> I mean, I can (and do) leverage "-march=native". And I certainly have an
> overly long USE flags... but it's the sheet satisfaction of knowing that
> my system is MY system that made me stick with Gentoo...
>
> It's eminently satisfying -- a geekgasm, if you will -- to know that
> one's kernel is lean and customized, all the toolchains have been tuned,
> and there are no useless things being installed...
>
> In regards to performance, the benefits might not be groundbreaking, but
> it's there, and when your server is being relentlessly hammered by
> requests, Gentoo seems to have additional breathing space where other
> distros choke...


Gentoo excels as a -dev system where your devs need to test things in
different environments.

A classic case is different pythons. We have many Centos 4 machines in
production that run python-2.4, the developers naturally run something
bleeding edge like 2.7 or 3.3 on their laptops.

Many many times they need to know if their bespoke code runs properly on
Centos, or PyPy or whatever other valid environment difference could
happen in the real world.

Tweak USE, tweak the masking and let emerge world do it's thing. Now the
dev can do valid tests. If the dev machines are VMs, snapshot them just
before starting this and you have the best possible solution for my money.

Or, try remove LDAP, NIS and PAM support for auth from a RHEL machine to
test if it works without those things in place.
RHEL? Impossible.
Gentoo? Trivially easy.



--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Mark David Dumlao-3
On 03/14/2013 09:28 PM, Alan McKinnon wrote:

> On 14/03/2013 14:12, Pandu Poluan wrote:
>> On Mar 14, 2013 4:14 PM, "William Kenworthy" <[hidden email]
>> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>> Did this few years back for an online magazine sponsored by a local
>>> linux sysadmin company who wanted to see the difference between generic
>>> debian and optimised (not necessarily gentoo, but thats what I used.)
>>>
>>> Difference in times was ~10% across the board for graphics manipulations
>>> (gimp scripts), spreadsheet tasks (gnumeric) and the like.
>>>
>>> The "kicker" - simple optimisations gained far, far more than generic
>>> compiler settings.  e.g., initially, the gnumeric versions were slightly
>>> different, with some wild times across the tasks.  Make em the same
>>> version (and cuedos to the gnumeric maintainer for jumping in and
>>> helping diagnose/fix the problem - newer version on gentoo was heaps
>>> slower :) and there was little difference.
>>>
>>> Shared libs like glibc didnt make a huge difference, but being smart
>>> about how/what a "particular" task was handled gained more.  If a debian
>>> app was compiled with similar options as to gentoo, little difference
>>> between them in performance which considering shared libs etc wasn't
>>> what I expected.
>>>
>>> The intel compilers are/were said to be a lot better than gcc, not sure
>>> if the gap is still there (supposedly 20% better again)
>>>
>>> Its how long is a piece of string kind of question if considered OS
>>> wide, but pick a narrow task and optimise away with smart programmers
>>> and you will do well on almost anything.
>>>
>>> Big advantage of gentoo - configurability, version control (what version
>>> is installed and changing it at short notice) and general flexibility.
>>>
>> This.
>>
>> Why I prefer Gentoo over other distros: Full control.
>>
>> I mean, I can (and do) leverage "-march=native". And I certainly have an
>> overly long USE flags... but it's the sheet satisfaction of knowing that
>> my system is MY system that made me stick with Gentoo...
>>
>> It's eminently satisfying -- a geekgasm, if you will -- to know that
>> one's kernel is lean and customized, all the toolchains have been tuned,
>> and there are no useless things being installed...
>>
>> In regards to performance, the benefits might not be groundbreaking, but
>> it's there, and when your server is being relentlessly hammered by
>> requests, Gentoo seems to have additional breathing space where other
>> distros choke...
>
> Gentoo excels as a -dev system where your devs need to test things in
> different environments.
>
> A classic case is different pythons. We have many Centos 4 machines in
> production that run python-2.4, the developers naturally run something
> bleeding edge like 2.7 or 3.3 on their laptops.
>
> Many many times they need to know if their bespoke code runs properly on
> Centos, or PyPy or whatever other valid environment difference could
> happen in the real world.
>
> Tweak USE, tweak the masking and let emerge world do it's thing. Now the
> dev can do valid tests. If the dev machines are VMs, snapshot them just
> before starting this and you have the best possible solution for my money.
>
> Or, try remove LDAP, NIS and PAM support for auth from a RHEL machine to
> test if it works without those things in place.
> RHEL? Impossible.
> Gentoo? Trivially easy.
"Trivially easy", of course, means an emerge -euDNtv world && emerge
-ctv && revdep-rebuild -i && revdep-rebuild ... ehehehe

I dunno, it might actually be easier to setup the said distros in a VM.
And if those configurations don't work, you shouldn't have to support
them, eh? ;)

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Alan McKinnon-2
On 14/03/2013 15:40, Mark David Dumlao wrote:

> On 03/14/2013 09:28 PM, Alan McKinnon wrote:
>> On 14/03/2013 14:12, Pandu Poluan wrote:
>>> On Mar 14, 2013 4:14 PM, "William Kenworthy" <[hidden email]
>>> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>>> Did this few years back for an online magazine sponsored by a local
>>>> linux sysadmin company who wanted to see the difference between generic
>>>> debian and optimised (not necessarily gentoo, but thats what I used.)
>>>>
>>>> Difference in times was ~10% across the board for graphics manipulations
>>>> (gimp scripts), spreadsheet tasks (gnumeric) and the like.
>>>>
>>>> The "kicker" - simple optimisations gained far, far more than generic
>>>> compiler settings.  e.g., initially, the gnumeric versions were slightly
>>>> different, with some wild times across the tasks.  Make em the same
>>>> version (and cuedos to the gnumeric maintainer for jumping in and
>>>> helping diagnose/fix the problem - newer version on gentoo was heaps
>>>> slower :) and there was little difference.
>>>>
>>>> Shared libs like glibc didnt make a huge difference, but being smart
>>>> about how/what a "particular" task was handled gained more.  If a debian
>>>> app was compiled with similar options as to gentoo, little difference
>>>> between them in performance which considering shared libs etc wasn't
>>>> what I expected.
>>>>
>>>> The intel compilers are/were said to be a lot better than gcc, not sure
>>>> if the gap is still there (supposedly 20% better again)
>>>>
>>>> Its how long is a piece of string kind of question if considered OS
>>>> wide, but pick a narrow task and optimise away with smart programmers
>>>> and you will do well on almost anything.
>>>>
>>>> Big advantage of gentoo - configurability, version control (what version
>>>> is installed and changing it at short notice) and general flexibility.
>>>>
>>> This.
>>>
>>> Why I prefer Gentoo over other distros: Full control.
>>>
>>> I mean, I can (and do) leverage "-march=native". And I certainly have an
>>> overly long USE flags... but it's the sheet satisfaction of knowing that
>>> my system is MY system that made me stick with Gentoo...
>>>
>>> It's eminently satisfying -- a geekgasm, if you will -- to know that
>>> one's kernel is lean and customized, all the toolchains have been tuned,
>>> and there are no useless things being installed...
>>>
>>> In regards to performance, the benefits might not be groundbreaking, but
>>> it's there, and when your server is being relentlessly hammered by
>>> requests, Gentoo seems to have additional breathing space where other
>>> distros choke...
>>
>> Gentoo excels as a -dev system where your devs need to test things in
>> different environments.
>>
>> A classic case is different pythons. We have many Centos 4 machines in
>> production that run python-2.4, the developers naturally run something
>> bleeding edge like 2.7 or 3.3 on their laptops.
>>
>> Many many times they need to know if their bespoke code runs properly on
>> Centos, or PyPy or whatever other valid environment difference could
>> happen in the real world.
>>
>> Tweak USE, tweak the masking and let emerge world do it's thing. Now the
>> dev can do valid tests. If the dev machines are VMs, snapshot them just
>> before starting this and you have the best possible solution for my money.
>>
>> Or, try remove LDAP, NIS and PAM support for auth from a RHEL machine to
>> test if it works without those things in place.
>> RHEL? Impossible.
>> Gentoo? Trivially easy.
> "Trivially easy", of course, means an emerge -euDNtv world && emerge
> -ctv && revdep-rebuild -i && revdep-rebuild ... ehehehe
>
> I dunno, it might actually be easier to setup the said distros in a VM.
> And if those configurations don't work, you shouldn't have to support
> them, eh? ;)
>


Well, devs tend to ask questions like "would this thing X work in
practice? or do I have to munge my code?"

They want to know if shipped code supports something. And, I don't get
to say "I'm sorry, I cannot support Centos 4 on this"

Business has a stock answer "Well, find a way to make it work."

Flexibility is the key. At least with

"emerge -euDNtv world && emerge -ctv && revdep-rebuild -i && revdep-rebuild"

I can walk away and come back in three hours, look at logs and tell them
to test. Plus I don't have to re-install their customer code everyt time
from scratch (said code *never*, of course, coming with anything
resembling a MakeFile)



--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Grant Edwards-6
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On 2013-03-14, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
> compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
> to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?

I just did a test, and they're all the same.

CDs/DVDS of various distros dropped from a height of 1m all hit the
floor simultaneously [there are random variations due to aerodynamic
instability of the disk shape, but it's the same for all distros]. If
launched horizontally with spin to provide attitude stability (thrown
like a frisbee), they all fly the same.

The point being, you're going to have to define "speed".

Does speed refer to

 Installation time?

 Boot time?

 Linpack?

 Dhrystone?

 Whetstone?

 Time for me to figure out how to fix a configuration problem?

 Time to do to an update on a machine that's been unplugged for a year?

 Time to to produce a packaged version of some random C program that
 comes with a Makefile that uses autotools?

 Time for a reported bug to get fixed?
 
--
Grant Edwards               grant.b.edwards        Yow! Is it 1974?  What's
                                  at               for SUPPER?  Can I spend
                              gmail.com            my COLLEGE FUND in one
                                                   wild afternoon??


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Alan McKinnon-2
On 14/03/2013 16:07, Grant Edwards wrote:

> On 2013-03-14, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I was wondering.  Has anyone ever seen where a test as been done to
>> compare the speed of Gentoo with other distros?  Maybe Gentoo compared
>> to Redhat, Mandrake, Ubuntu and such?
>
> I just did a test, and they're all the same.
>
> CDs/DVDS of various distros dropped from a height of 1m all hit the
> floor simultaneously [there are random variations due to aerodynamic
> instability of the disk shape, but it's the same for all distros]. If
> launched horizontally with spin to provide attitude stability (thrown
> like a frisbee), they all fly the same.


nonononononono, gentoo is much faster.

I did the same test, but comparing Centos on a DVD with Gentoo on a USB
stick. The stick tends to fall about 8% faster, mostly due to removing
those aerodynamic instabilities causing lift effects from the wing-like
shape of the DVD.

I consider this a perfectly valid test as Gentoo is designed to let me
remove unwanted side-effects from the environment. The shape of a DVD
was unwanted, so I made a tweak to take it out.



p.s. good joke on your part :-)
Dale is never going to live this one down. But he's a big boy, he can
take it.



>
> The point being, you're going to have to define "speed".
>
> Does speed refer to
>
>  Installation time?
>
>  Boot time?
>
>  Linpack?
>
>  Dhrystone?
>
>  Whetstone?
>
>  Time for me to figure out how to fix a configuration problem?
>
>  Time to do to an update on a machine that's been unplugged for a year?
>
>  Time to to produce a packaged version of some random C program that
>  comes with a Makefile that uses autotools?
>
>  Time for a reported bug to get fixed?
>  
>


--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Paul Hartman-3
In reply to this post by Pandu Poluan
On Thu, Mar 14, 2013 at 7:12 AM, Pandu Poluan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Why I prefer Gentoo over other distros: Full control.

That's it, in a nutshell.

> I mean, I can (and do) leverage "-march=native".

I've been scared away from -march and instead of -mtune in case i need
to drop my hard drive into another system for recovery which might
have an incompatible CPU.

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Re: Gentoo speed comparison to other distros

Neil Bothwick
In reply to this post by Mark David Dumlao-3
On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:40:49 +0800, Mark David Dumlao wrote:

> > Or, try remove LDAP, NIS and PAM support for auth from a RHEL machine
> > to test if it works without those things in place.
> > RHEL? Impossible.
> > Gentoo? Trivially easy.  

> "Trivially easy", of course, means an emerge -euDNtv world && emerge
> -ctv && revdep-rebuild -i && revdep-rebuild ... ehehehe

There's no need to rebuild everything, and those other flags make no
sense when using -e. Generally you only need

emerge -uaD --changed-use @world


--
Neil Bothwick

Set phasers to extreme itching!

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