Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

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Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mark Knecht
Hi all,
   I haven't been here in a couple of years. IT's great to see some familiar names posting. Cheers to all. 

   I have a laptop running Win 10 with no (working) DVD/CDROM. For various reasons I want to move from a 10 year old laptop drive to a new SSD and am looking for guidance on I might do that. Win 10 is properly licensed but through a weird channel - it was Win 7 that M$ allowed to convert to Win 10 for free and I'm nervous that if the hard drive died I'd have to purchase a new license as the free conversion path likely doesn't exist anymore.

   Both drives are nominally 500GB.

   The older hard drive fdisk info shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sde
Disk /dev/sde: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xe0c5913d

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sde1              63  45062324  45062262  21.5G 1c Hidden W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sde2  *     45062325 288063133 243000809 115.9G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sde3       288063488 289247231   1183744   578M 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sde4       289249254 976768064 687518811 327.9G fd Linux raid autodetect
root@science:~#

The Linux RAID autodetect is from running Gentoo at some earlier time and probably doesn't need to be copied. I'm not at all sure what /dev/sde3 is or whether it's required to make M$ happy.

   The new SSD is unused and shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sdf
Disk /dev/sdf: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
root@science:~# 

   The appear to have the same sector count and overall size.

   I can make a 1TB drive available in my big machine and work over USB (which is what I'm doing to get the info above) but I'm unclear how much of this can be done automatically and how much I might need to do by hand.

   As long as I don't hurt the old drive I can put data on the SSD multiple times to get through the process in case I have trouble.

   Does anyone have experience with this sort of issue and can you point me toward some instructions I might try?

Thanks,
Mark


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Michael Jones
Generally the way I've handled this situation in the past is like so (this is written from memory, so expect gratuitous problems).

On the machine with the drive attached
mbuffer -i /dev/mydrive | xz -e -9 | mbuffer -O hostname:port

On a machine with storage space
mbuffer -I port -o /path/to/storage.xz

To make a backup.


In terms of cloning windows to another harddrive in general, as long as the destination harddrive is large enough to fit the original drive without issues, simply running:

dd if=/dev/original of=/dev/destination
(I prefer dcfldd, personally)

Is enough. Run gparted (the graphical version, for nice wizards) after, and it'll fixup your partition table for you to match the new size, and you can re-size any partitions you have to make them match as well. I do exactly this all the time and have yet to have a problem.

As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package manager.

If it doesn't activate as soon as you plug in an ethernet cable, you can just wipe your SSD and copy your old installation as discussed already.



On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 1:11 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,
   I haven't been here in a couple of years. IT's great to see some familiar names posting. Cheers to all. 

   I have a laptop running Win 10 with no (working) DVD/CDROM. For various reasons I want to move from a 10 year old laptop drive to a new SSD and am looking for guidance on I might do that. Win 10 is properly licensed but through a weird channel - it was Win 7 that M$ allowed to convert to Win 10 for free and I'm nervous that if the hard drive died I'd have to purchase a new license as the free conversion path likely doesn't exist anymore.

   Both drives are nominally 500GB.

   The older hard drive fdisk info shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sde
Disk /dev/sde: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xe0c5913d

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sde1              63  45062324  45062262  21.5G 1c Hidden W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sde2  *     45062325 288063133 243000809 115.9G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sde3       288063488 289247231   1183744   578M 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sde4       289249254 976768064 687518811 327.9G fd Linux raid autodetect
root@science:~#

The Linux RAID autodetect is from running Gentoo at some earlier time and probably doesn't need to be copied. I'm not at all sure what /dev/sde3 is or whether it's required to make M$ happy.

   The new SSD is unused and shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sdf
Disk /dev/sdf: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
root@science:~# 

   The appear to have the same sector count and overall size.

   I can make a 1TB drive available in my big machine and work over USB (which is what I'm doing to get the info above) but I'm unclear how much of this can be done automatically and how much I might need to do by hand.

   As long as I don't hurt the old drive I can put data on the SSD multiple times to get through the process in case I have trouble.

   Does anyone have experience with this sort of issue and can you point me toward some instructions I might try?

Thanks,
Mark


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mark Knecht
Hi Michael,
   Thanks for the response. Great info.

   The install Win 10 clean sounds wonderful if it works. With no DVD in this machine it sounds like I should investigate an install from USB if the machine supports it. It's an Asus gaming laptop circa 2008 so hopefully that works but I've never done it on this machine.

Cheers,
Mark

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 12:56 PM Michael Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:
Generally the way I've handled this situation in the past is like so (this is written from memory, so expect gratuitous problems).

On the machine with the drive attached
mbuffer -i /dev/mydrive | xz -e -9 | mbuffer -O hostname:port

On a machine with storage space
mbuffer -I port -o /path/to/storage.xz

To make a backup.


In terms of cloning windows to another harddrive in general, as long as the destination harddrive is large enough to fit the original drive without issues, simply running:

dd if=/dev/original of=/dev/destination
(I prefer dcfldd, personally)

Is enough. Run gparted (the graphical version, for nice wizards) after, and it'll fixup your partition table for you to match the new size, and you can re-size any partitions you have to make them match as well. I do exactly this all the time and have yet to have a problem.

As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package manager.

If it doesn't activate as soon as you plug in an ethernet cable, you can just wipe your SSD and copy your old installation as discussed already.



On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 1:11 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,
   I haven't been here in a couple of years. IT's great to see some familiar names posting. Cheers to all. 

   I have a laptop running Win 10 with no (working) DVD/CDROM. For various reasons I want to move from a 10 year old laptop drive to a new SSD and am looking for guidance on I might do that. Win 10 is properly licensed but through a weird channel - it was Win 7 that M$ allowed to convert to Win 10 for free and I'm nervous that if the hard drive died I'd have to purchase a new license as the free conversion path likely doesn't exist anymore.

   Both drives are nominally 500GB.

   The older hard drive fdisk info shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sde
Disk /dev/sde: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xe0c5913d

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sde1              63  45062324  45062262  21.5G 1c Hidden W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sde2  *     45062325 288063133 243000809 115.9G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sde3       288063488 289247231   1183744   578M 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sde4       289249254 976768064 687518811 327.9G fd Linux raid autodetect
root@science:~#

The Linux RAID autodetect is from running Gentoo at some earlier time and probably doesn't need to be copied. I'm not at all sure what /dev/sde3 is or whether it's required to make M$ happy.

   The new SSD is unused and shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sdf
Disk /dev/sdf: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
root@science:~# 

   The appear to have the same sector count and overall size.

   I can make a 1TB drive available in my big machine and work over USB (which is what I'm doing to get the info above) but I'm unclear how much of this can be done automatically and how much I might need to do by hand.

   As long as I don't hurt the old drive I can put data on the SSD multiple times to get through the process in case I have trouble.

   Does anyone have experience with this sort of issue and can you point me toward some instructions I might try?

Thanks,
Mark


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Michael Jones
You can use the Windows 10 Download Tool (Or similarly named thing, sorry, I can't find the details of it at this time) to download an ISO image

Combine that with the rufus program https://rufus.ie/ (I use the portable one, personally) to create a Windows 10 USB installer stick.

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 2:39 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Michael,
   Thanks for the response. Great info.

   The install Win 10 clean sounds wonderful if it works. With no DVD in this machine it sounds like I should investigate an install from USB if the machine supports it. It's an Asus gaming laptop circa 2008 so hopefully that works but I've never done it on this machine.

Cheers,
Mark

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 12:56 PM Michael Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:
Generally the way I've handled this situation in the past is like so (this is written from memory, so expect gratuitous problems).

On the machine with the drive attached
mbuffer -i /dev/mydrive | xz -e -9 | mbuffer -O hostname:port

On a machine with storage space
mbuffer -I port -o /path/to/storage.xz

To make a backup.


In terms of cloning windows to another harddrive in general, as long as the destination harddrive is large enough to fit the original drive without issues, simply running:

dd if=/dev/original of=/dev/destination
(I prefer dcfldd, personally)

Is enough. Run gparted (the graphical version, for nice wizards) after, and it'll fixup your partition table for you to match the new size, and you can re-size any partitions you have to make them match as well. I do exactly this all the time and have yet to have a problem.

As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package manager.

If it doesn't activate as soon as you plug in an ethernet cable, you can just wipe your SSD and copy your old installation as discussed already.



On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 1:11 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,
   I haven't been here in a couple of years. IT's great to see some familiar names posting. Cheers to all. 

   I have a laptop running Win 10 with no (working) DVD/CDROM. For various reasons I want to move from a 10 year old laptop drive to a new SSD and am looking for guidance on I might do that. Win 10 is properly licensed but through a weird channel - it was Win 7 that M$ allowed to convert to Win 10 for free and I'm nervous that if the hard drive died I'd have to purchase a new license as the free conversion path likely doesn't exist anymore.

   Both drives are nominally 500GB.

   The older hard drive fdisk info shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sde
Disk /dev/sde: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xe0c5913d

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sde1              63  45062324  45062262  21.5G 1c Hidden W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sde2  *     45062325 288063133 243000809 115.9G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sde3       288063488 289247231   1183744   578M 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sde4       289249254 976768064 687518811 327.9G fd Linux raid autodetect
root@science:~#

The Linux RAID autodetect is from running Gentoo at some earlier time and probably doesn't need to be copied. I'm not at all sure what /dev/sde3 is or whether it's required to make M$ happy.

   The new SSD is unused and shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sdf
Disk /dev/sdf: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
root@science:~# 

   The appear to have the same sector count and overall size.

   I can make a 1TB drive available in my big machine and work over USB (which is what I'm doing to get the info above) but I'm unclear how much of this can be done automatically and how much I might need to do by hand.

   As long as I don't hurt the old drive I can put data on the SSD multiple times to get through the process in case I have trouble.

   Does anyone have experience with this sort of issue and can you point me toward some instructions I might try?

Thanks,
Mark


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mark Knecht
Michael,
   I got Win 10 Pro installed via the M$ tool that creates USB install devices. It worked fine. Reading online it seems that if M$ sees the new disk as still the same 'hardware' then it's supposed to automatically validate and I'd be good to go. so far, after 2 hours it hasn't done that but I'll give it awhile and see what happens. As it only took an hour I might still try the disk copy path and see if that comes up validated as that would also transfer the couple of applications I have on the original hard drive.

   Anyway, thanks for the ideas.

Cheers,
Mark

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 3:01 PM Michael Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:
You can use the Windows 10 Download Tool (Or similarly named thing, sorry, I can't find the details of it at this time) to download an ISO image

Combine that with the rufus program https://rufus.ie/ (I use the portable one, personally) to create a Windows 10 USB installer stick.

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 2:39 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Michael,
   Thanks for the response. Great info.

   The install Win 10 clean sounds wonderful if it works. With no DVD in this machine it sounds like I should investigate an install from USB if the machine supports it. It's an Asus gaming laptop circa 2008 so hopefully that works but I've never done it on this machine.

Cheers,
Mark

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 12:56 PM Michael Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:
Generally the way I've handled this situation in the past is like so (this is written from memory, so expect gratuitous problems).

On the machine with the drive attached
mbuffer -i /dev/mydrive | xz -e -9 | mbuffer -O hostname:port

On a machine with storage space
mbuffer -I port -o /path/to/storage.xz

To make a backup.


In terms of cloning windows to another harddrive in general, as long as the destination harddrive is large enough to fit the original drive without issues, simply running:

dd if=/dev/original of=/dev/destination
(I prefer dcfldd, personally)

Is enough. Run gparted (the graphical version, for nice wizards) after, and it'll fixup your partition table for you to match the new size, and you can re-size any partitions you have to make them match as well. I do exactly this all the time and have yet to have a problem.

As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package manager.

If it doesn't activate as soon as you plug in an ethernet cable, you can just wipe your SSD and copy your old installation as discussed already.



On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 1:11 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,
   I haven't been here in a couple of years. IT's great to see some familiar names posting. Cheers to all. 

   I have a laptop running Win 10 with no (working) DVD/CDROM. For various reasons I want to move from a 10 year old laptop drive to a new SSD and am looking for guidance on I might do that. Win 10 is properly licensed but through a weird channel - it was Win 7 that M$ allowed to convert to Win 10 for free and I'm nervous that if the hard drive died I'd have to purchase a new license as the free conversion path likely doesn't exist anymore.

   Both drives are nominally 500GB.

   The older hard drive fdisk info shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sde
Disk /dev/sde: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xe0c5913d

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sde1              63  45062324  45062262  21.5G 1c Hidden W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sde2  *     45062325 288063133 243000809 115.9G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sde3       288063488 289247231   1183744   578M 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sde4       289249254 976768064 687518811 327.9G fd Linux raid autodetect
root@science:~#

The Linux RAID autodetect is from running Gentoo at some earlier time and probably doesn't need to be copied. I'm not at all sure what /dev/sde3 is or whether it's required to make M$ happy.

   The new SSD is unused and shows:

root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sdf
Disk /dev/sdf: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Disk model: ASM1053E         
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
root@science:~# 

   The appear to have the same sector count and overall size.

   I can make a 1TB drive available in my big machine and work over USB (which is what I'm doing to get the info above) but I'm unclear how much of this can be done automatically and how much I might need to do by hand.

   As long as I don't hurt the old drive I can put data on the SSD multiple times to get through the process in case I have trouble.

   Does anyone have experience with this sort of issue and can you point me toward some instructions I might try?

Thanks,
Mark


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mick-10
In reply to this post by Michael Jones
Hi Mark, welcome back!  :-)

On Monday, 6 January 2020 19:55:44 GMT Michael Jones wrote:

> Generally the way I've handled this situation in the past is like so (this
> is written from memory, so expect gratuitous problems).
>
> On the machine with the drive attached
> mbuffer -i /dev/mydrive | xz -e -9 | mbuffer -O hostname:port
>
> On a machine with storage space
> mbuffer -I port -o /path/to/storage.xz
>
> To make a backup.
Useful for creating a compressed backup image over the network, but not for
cloning.


> In terms of cloning windows to another harddrive in general, as long as the
> destination harddrive is large enough to fit the original drive without
> issues, simply running:
>
> dd if=/dev/original of=/dev/destination
> (I prefer dcfldd, personally)

This will take for-ever on larger disks as it will be copying all empty bits
and bytes.  Instead you may wish to try clonezilla, or partclone.

https://clonezilla.org/

Clonezilla Live will copy the whole disk or selected partitions along with
their UUIDs, so Win10 should have no idea it was just migrated.  ;-)

You'll need a USB/eSATA caddy to put your new drive in and connect it to the
candidate laptop, or fit both drives in your desktop and perform the cloning
there.  Here's the step-by-step instructions you asked for:

https://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live-doc.php

--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mark Knecht
On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 4:38 PM Mick <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Hi Mark, welcome back!  :-)
>

Hey Mick. Thanks for the welcome.

<SNIP>

> This will take for-ever on larger disks as it will be copying all empty bits
> and bytes.  Instead you may wish to try clonezilla, or partclone.
>
> https://clonezilla.org/
>
> Clonezilla Live will copy the whole disk or selected partitions along with
> their UUIDs, so Win10 should have no idea it was just migrated.  ;-)
>
> You'll need a USB/eSATA caddy to put your new drive in and connect it to the
> candidate laptop, or fit both drives in your desktop and perform the cloning
> there.  Here's the step-by-step instructions you asked for:
>
> https://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live-doc.php
>
Good point about the amount of time. I'll investigate. If the SSD came up as activated that would be a big win as it hasn't happened on it's own with the new install. Thanks!

Cheers,
Mark
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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

William Kenworthy
In reply to this post by Mark Knecht
Hi Mark,
     was your old version Win10 PRO" as well? - as far as I know a
reinstall will only validate if the hardware as recorded at MS mostly
matches and its the same version.  Cloning via dd, then running through
the re-validation checks, then making changes in small steps is the only
way I have been able to make it work despite what is written in the link
below.

Also check out:
https://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-will-microsoft-charge-you-if-you-need-to-reinstall/

BillK


On 7/1/20 7:37 am, Mark Knecht wrote:

> Michael,
>    I got Win 10 Pro installed via the M$ tool that creates USB install
> devices. It worked fine. Reading online it seems that if M$ sees the
> new disk as still the same 'hardware' then it's supposed to
> automatically validate and I'd be good to go. so far, after 2 hours it
> hasn't done that but I'll give it awhile and see what happens. As it
> only took an hour I might still try the disk copy path and see if that
> comes up validated as that would also transfer the couple of
> applications I have on the original hard drive.
>
>    Anyway, thanks for the ideas.
>
> Cheers,
> Mark
>
> On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 3:01 PM Michael Jones <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     You can use the Windows 10 Download Tool (Or similarly named
>     thing, sorry, I can't find the details of it at this time) to
>     download an ISO image
>
>     Combine that with the rufus program https://rufus.ie/ (I use the
>     portable one, personally) to create a Windows 10 USB installer stick.
>
>     On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 2:39 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]
>     <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>         Hi Michael,
>            Thanks for the response. Great info.
>
>            The install Win 10 clean sounds wonderful if it works. With
>         no DVD in this machine it sounds like I should investigate an
>         install from USB if the machine supports it. It's an Asus
>         gaming laptop circa 2008 so hopefully that works but I've
>         never done it on this machine.
>
>         Cheers,
>         Mark
>
>         On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 12:56 PM Michael Jones
>         <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>             Generally the way I've handled this situation in the past
>             is like so (this is written from memory, so expect
>             gratuitous problems).
>
>             On the machine with the drive attached
>             mbuffer -i /dev/mydrive | xz -e -9 | mbuffer -O hostname:port
>
>             On a machine with storage space
>             mbuffer -I port -o /path/to/storage.xz
>
>             To make a backup.
>
>
>             In terms of cloning windows to another harddrive in
>             general, as long as the destination harddrive is large
>             enough to fit the original drive without issues, simply
>             running:
>
>             dd if=/dev/original of=/dev/destination
>             (I prefer dcfldd, personally)
>
>             Is enough. Run gparted (the graphical version, for nice
>             wizards) after, and it'll fixup your partition table for
>             you to match the new size, and you can re-size any
>             partitions you have to make them match as well. I do
>             exactly this all the time and have yet to have a problem.
>
>             As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this
>             blindly, but your license should be tied to the hardware
>             fingerprint of the laptop. So even installing windows
>             fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows activating
>             automatically. In fact, you might want to take this
>             opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh
>             installation without the decade of old cruft built up by
>             window's lack of a package manager.
>
>             If it doesn't activate as soon as you plug in an ethernet
>             cable, you can just wipe your SSD and copy your old
>             installation as discussed already.
>
>
>
>             On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 1:11 PM Mark Knecht
>             <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>                 Hi all,
>                    I haven't been here in a couple of years. IT's
>                 great to see some familiar names posting. Cheers to all.
>
>                    I have a laptop running Win 10 with no (working)
>                 DVD/CDROM. For various reasons I want to move from a
>                 10 year old laptop drive to a new SSD and am looking
>                 for guidance on I might do that. Win 10 is properly
>                 licensed but through a weird channel - it was Win 7
>                 that M$ allowed to convert to Win 10 for free and I'm
>                 nervous that if the hard drive died I'd have to
>                 purchase a new license as the free conversion path
>                 likely doesn't exist anymore.
>
>                    Both drives are nominally 500GB.
>
>                    The older hard drive fdisk info shows:
>
>                 root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sde
>                 Disk /dev/sde: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes,
>                 976773168 sectors
>                 Disk model: ASM1053E
>                 Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
>                 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
>                 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
>                 Disklabel type: dos
>                 Disk identifier: 0xe0c5913d
>
>                 DeviceBoot    Start      End  Sectors  SizeIdType
>                 /dev/sde1              63  45062324  45062262  21.5G
>                 1c Hidden W95 FAT32 (LBA)
>                 /dev/sde2  *     45062325 288063133 243000809 115.9G
>                  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
>                 /dev/sde3       288063488 289247231   1183744   578M
>                 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
>                 /dev/sde4       289249254 976768064 687518811 327.9G
>                 fd Linux raid autodetect
>                 root@science:~#
>
>                 The Linux RAID autodetect is from running Gentoo at
>                 some earlier time and probably doesn't need to be
>                 copied. I'm not at all sure what /dev/sde3 is or
>                 whether it's required to make M$ happy.
>
>                    The new SSD is unused and shows:
>
>                 root@science:~# fdisk --list /dev/sdf
>                 Disk /dev/sdf: 465.8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes,
>                 976773168 sectors
>                 Disk model: ASM1053E
>                 Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
>                 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
>                 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
>                 root@science:~#
>
>                    The appear to have the same sector count and
>                 overall size.
>
>                    I can make a 1TB drive available in my big machine
>                 and work over USB (which is what I'm doing to get the
>                 info above) but I'm unclear how much of this can be
>                 done automatically and how much I might need to do by
>                 hand.
>
>                    As long as I don't hurt the old drive I can put
>                 data on the SSD multiple times to get through the
>                 process in case I have trouble.
>
>                    Does anyone have experience with this sort of issue
>                 and can you point me toward some instructions I might try?
>
>                 Thanks,
>                 Mark
>
>


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mark Knecht


On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 5:19 PM Bill Kenworthy <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Hi Mark,
>      was your old version Win10 PRO" as well? - as far as I know a
> reinstall will only validate if the hardware as recorded at MS mostly
> matches and its the same version.  Cloning via dd, then running through
> the re-validation checks, then making changes in small steps is the only
> way I have been able to make it work despite what is written in the link
> below.
>
> Also check out:
> https://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-will-microsoft-charge-you-if-you-need-to-reinstall/
>
> BillK
>

Bill,
   It's a great question that I cannot answer with certainty unless I put the old drive back in. I thought it was when I did the install this afternoon but I wasn't sure. 

   I'm going to let the machine sit overnight and see if it activates automatically. If it doesn't I'll go back to the old drive and if needed will do a new reinstall with the right version. If I can get away with this path I will. If not I'll go with something like Mick suggested.

thanks,
Mark
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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Michael Jones
I would be extremely surprised if it activated after not having done so within an hour.

You can manually trigger activation in the Windows 10 settings menu somewhere, and get an answer immediately.

You *do* need to make sure the version of Windows is 100% identical to what was previously installed though, down to the various international version that have different language packs and misc media features enabled / disabled.


On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 6:39 PM Mark Knecht <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 5:19 PM Bill Kenworthy <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Hi Mark,
>      was your old version Win10 PRO" as well? - as far as I know a
> reinstall will only validate if the hardware as recorded at MS mostly
> matches and its the same version.  Cloning via dd, then running through
> the re-validation checks, then making changes in small steps is the only
> way I have been able to make it work despite what is written in the link
> below.
>
> Also check out:
> https://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-will-microsoft-charge-you-if-you-need-to-reinstall/
>
> BillK
>

Bill,
   It's a great question that I cannot answer with certainty unless I put the old drive back in. I thought it was when I did the install this afternoon but I wasn't sure. 

   I'm going to let the machine sit overnight and see if it activates automatically. If it doesn't I'll go back to the old drive and if needed will do a new reinstall with the right version. If I can get away with this path I will. If not I'll go with something like Mick suggested.

thanks,
Mark
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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mick-10
In reply to this post by Mark Knecht
This is getting a tad O/T, since we're talking about activation of a non-
Gentoo OS, but here it goes:

On Tuesday, 7 January 2020 00:39:19 GMT Mark Knecht wrote:

>    I'm going to let the machine sit overnight and see if it activates
> automatically.

It should activate as long as it is connected to the Internet, but there are
two different ways of activating Windows 10 manually, should you not do so
during the installation procedure.

1. Using a product key and entering this when you try to activate it.  This is
the conventional way of activating the installation when you buy a Windows 10
from a retailer.  To check the activation status go to Start > Settings >
Update & Security > Activation.

NOTE:  A Windows 10 installation is linked to the UUID of the MoBo, which is
stored on the Windows Activation Servers and mapped against your Product key.  
If you change the hardware you will need to re-enter the Product key to
activate the upgraded hardware.

2. Using your Microsoft account credentials, which must be linked to the
Windows 10 installation's "Digital License".  This is a relatively new way and
allows you to install Windows 10 on different PCs (one at a time), change the
MoBo, etc., but each time you (re)install it you must use the same edition of
Windows 10 and sign in to your Microsoft account linked to the original
digital license.

Since your existing installation is already activated, you may be able to link
its Digital License to your Microsoft account - but this depends how it was
activate (Product Key or Digital License).  If the activation status shows:

"Windows is activated with a digital license", then your Microsoft account is
not yet linked to this installation.  In this case, follow instructions to
"Add an account".

"Windows is activated with a digital license linked to your Microsoft
account", then you are good to install afresh on a different disk/PC and add
your Microsoft account credentials when asked.


> If it doesn't I'll go back to the old drive and if needed
> will do a new reinstall with the right version. If I can get away with this
> path I will. If not I'll go with something like Mick suggested.
>
> thanks,
> Mark

Partition UUIDs are important if you are restoring Windows from an old
installation, but for a different reason.  The Windows boot loader uses the
partition UUIDs to boot the OS.  If you have created a new C:\ partition and
transferred all the OS files in there, the boot loader will fail to boot it
because the new partition's UUID will be different.


PS. The above is just a summary of my understanding.  I am not an experienced
MSWindows user, so I may well have got some details wrong.  You should search
the https://support.microsoft.com/ website for reinstallation steps.

PPS. As far as I know you can use Windows 10 without activating it, but there
is no guarantee Microsoft won't stop Windows Updates for installations which
have not been activated some day in the future and future upgrades to later OS
releases may be blocked.  As far as I know a non-activated installation is not
crippleware.  Perhaps some 3rd party proprietary applications will refuse to
install on a non-activated MSWindows installation, but I haven't come across
any in my very limited experience with this OS.
--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mark Knecht


On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 4:52 AM Mick <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> This is getting a tad O/T, since we're talking about activation of a non-
> Gentoo OS, but here it goes:
>

I completely agree. I wasn't expecting the conversation to go this direction when I posted. I'm happy to participate if others want to.

> On Tuesday, 7 January 2020 00:39:19 GMT Mark Knecht wrote:
>
> >    I'm going to let the machine sit overnight and see if it activates
> > automatically.
>
> It should activate as long as it is connected to the Internet, but there are
> two different ways of activating Windows 10 manually, should you not do so
> during the installation procedure.
>

After maybe 16 hours it didn't activate but logically I don't know why it would have. I've installed Win 10 using the M$ install tool writing to a USB flash drive but I'm not given any product IDs/Keys. M$ would have had to determine on their own with no help from me this was a reinstall and generously activated it which I think is asking too much.

Owing that I'm not 100% sure the previous install was actually Win 10 Pro, having updated from Win 7 with their free conversion to Win 10, I'm going to put the old drive back in, double check what version of Win 10 I was using and then try again if I installed the wrong version this time.

On a more Linux note I'll build a bootable USB drive with clonezilla and see about cloning the old drive to the new SDD that way. that sort of solution is why I posted here in the first place. Trying the Win 10 install and hoping it worked was just an easy 1-day experiment.

Thanks all,
Mark

P.S. - I'd love to get back to running Gentoo one of these days. For those of us that wanted a stable machine with just a couple of testing packages, especially as the machines become older and the software becomes larger, it just became too many hours building code, especially on these older laptops. Kubuntu has worked well enough for me be there's no better community that you here at gentoo-user for straight forward technical discussion and I want to thank everyone here for years and years of good times and good information.


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mick-10
I'll keep going with this, because there is a Gentoo twist at the end!  LOL!

On Tuesday, 7 January 2020 16:58:43 GMT Mark Knecht wrote:

> After maybe 16 hours it didn't activate but logically I don't know why it
> would have. I've installed Win 10 using the M$ install tool writing to a
> USB flash drive but I'm not given any product IDs/Keys. M$ would have had
> to determine on their own with no help from me this was a reinstall and
> generously activated it which I think is asking too much.

The (re)activation process does not work like you assume.  Your MS Product key
would have been provided with the original (Windows 7) installation media, a
sticker under the laptop, your laptop's OEM box/activation card, or the
MSWindows Online Shop.  If you do not possess this key you cannot readily
(re)activate the installation.

You could call Microsoft Support to ask for your key since this is a legit
installation, but as the key is still in the original disk, boot into the old
disk and use some of the methods mentioned here to extract it:

https://www.howtogeek.com/206329/how-to-find-your-lost-windows-or-office-product-keys/


> Owing that I'm not 100% sure the previous install was actually Win 10 Pro,
> having updated from Win 7 with their free conversion to Win 10, I'm going
> to put the old drive back in, double check what version of Win 10 I was
> using and then try again if I installed the wrong version this time.

Yes, the Product key or Digital License can only be reused on the same Windows
10 edition as the original.  If not you'll get some error pointing to the fact
your key is not suitable for the edition of the OS you are trying to activate.


> On a more Linux note I'll build a bootable USB drive with clonezilla and
> see about cloning the old drive to the new SDD that way. that sort of
> solution is why I posted here in the first place. Trying the Win 10 install
> and hoping it worked was just an easy 1-day experiment.

That could be the easiest way without having to fight your way through the
Windows Activation Process.  On the other hand, if you manage to re-activate
it, you'll know how to go about it next time you reinstall - this is MSWindows
after all!  ;-)


> P.S. - I'd love to get back to running Gentoo one of these days. For those
> of us that wanted a stable machine with just a couple of testing packages,
> especially as the machines become older and the software becomes larger, it
> just became too many hours building code, especially on these older
> laptops. Kubuntu has worked well enough for me be there's no better
> community that you here at gentoo-user for straight forward technical
> discussion and I want to thank everyone here for years and years of good
> times and good information.

Have a search for 'chroot' and 'cross-compiling' on Gentoo wiki & forums.  
There should be a few articles explaining how to cross-compile binary packages
within a chrooted directory on a faster/bigger/better PC and then rsync and
emerge these packages with '--usepkg y', or '--usepkgonly y' on the slower
laptop.  As far as the laptop is concerned, this last part ought to be almost
as fast as updating/installing binary packages on Kubuntu.  This is probably
the only way to install really large compiled applications like Chromium,
LibreOffice, etc. on old PCs with very low RAM.

--
Regards,
Mick



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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Daniel Frey-6
In reply to this post by Mark Knecht
On 1/7/20 8:58 AM, Mark Knecht wrote:

>
>
> On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 4:52 AM Mick <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
> >
> > This is getting a tad O/T, since we're talking about activation of a
> non-
> > Gentoo OS, but here it goes:
> >
>
> I completely agree. I wasn't expecting the conversation to go this
> direction when I posted. I'm happy to participate if others want to.
>
> > On Tuesday, 7 January 2020 00:39:19 GMT Mark Knecht wrote:
> >
> > >    I'm going to let the machine sit overnight and see if it activates
> > > automatically.
> >
> > It should activate as long as it is connected to the Internet, but
> there are
> > two different ways of activating Windows 10 manually, should you not
> do so
> > during the installation procedure.
> >
>
> After maybe 16 hours it didn't activate but logically I don't know why
> it would have. I've installed Win 10 using the M$ install tool writing
> to a USB flash drive but I'm not given any product IDs/Keys. M$ would
> have had to determine on their own with no help from me this was a
> reinstall and generously activated it which I think is asking too much.
>
> Owing that I'm not 100% sure the previous install was actually Win 10
> Pro, having updated from Win 7 with their free conversion to Win 10,
> I'm going to put the old drive back in, double check what version of
> Win 10 I was using and then try again if I installed the wrong version
> this time.
>
> On a more Linux note I'll build a bootable USB drive with clonezilla
> and see about cloning the old drive to the new SDD that way. that sort
> of solution is why I posted here in the first place. Trying the Win 10
> install and hoping it worked was just an easy 1-day experiment.
>
> Thanks all,
> Mark
>
> P.S. - I'd love to get back to running Gentoo one of these days. For
> those of us that wanted a stable machine with just a couple of testing
> packages, especially as the machines become older and the software
> becomes larger, it just became too many hours building code,
> especially on these older laptops. Kubuntu has worked well enough for
> me be there's no better community that you here at gentoo-user for
> straight forward technical discussion and I want to thank everyone
> here for years and years of good times and good information.
>
>
As mentioned earlier you need your Windows 7 key for activation. If you
have to reenter the key sometimes the Windows UI is dubious and doesn't
offer a clear-cut way to do this. To get around it, open Powershell and
use `slmgr /ipk <your windows 7 key>` to install the key you have.

Dan


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

antlists
In reply to this post by Michael Jones
On 06/01/20 19:55, Michael Jones wrote:
>
> As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your
> license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So
> even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows
> activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this
> opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation
> without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package
> manager.

Two points with this - firstly if (like me) you DON'T have an MS
account, this fingerprint is not stored anywhere so that won't work.
Secondly, the fingerprint is likely stored on the hard drive somewhere
so if you clone the hard drive you are hopefully good, and thirdly it's
possible that the new hard drive will break the fingerprint so you're
SOL whatever you do. However, in that last case, if you ring the
licencing help line they MAY give you a new code because it is, still,
technically the same laptop.

Cheers,
Wol

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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

antlists
In reply to this post by Mark Knecht
On 06/01/20 23:37, Mark Knecht wrote:

> Michael,
>    I got Win 10 Pro installed via the M$ tool that creates USB install
> devices. It worked fine. Reading online it seems that if M$ sees the new
> disk as still the same 'hardware' then it's supposed to automatically
> validate and I'd be good to go. so far, after 2 hours it hasn't done
> that but I'll give it awhile and see what happens. As it only took an
> hour I might still try the disk copy path and see if that comes up
> validated as that would also transfer the couple of applications I have
> on the original hard drive.
>
>    Anyway, thanks for the ideas.
>
A few more ideas from my experience -

Have you ever re-installed windows and actually used the licence key
that came with the laptop? No? Then try a clean install of Win10 using
the Win7 key.

Nearly all regular computers come with a bulk licence install, and the
key that is actually on the sticker is usually completely unused. If you
try to install Win10 with a Win7 key that has never been used, it will
activate. That's how I did a clean install on my laptop. (And it's
certainly true of Office, maybe of Win also - if you give it a key, it
will install the version that matches the key.)

Or just buy a key from Amazon. I think I paid about £15 and had
absolutely no trouble. I've bought a bunch of Win and Office keys off
Amazon at between £10 and £20 and they've all installed no problem
whatsoever. (Thanks to an EU legal ruling, MS cannot block the sale of
2nd-hand licence keys ...)

The last route, if you want to clean as much cruft as you can, is to do
a "factory reset" of the laptop, and then upgrade to Win10 over it.
Okay, it's not a completely clean install, but it gets you as close as
possible to a clean OEM install.

Cheers,
Wol


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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Michael Jones
In reply to this post by antlists

On Wed, Jan 8, 2020 at 1:01 AM Wols Lists <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 06/01/20 19:55, Michael Jones wrote:
>
> As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your
> license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So
> even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows
> activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this
> opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation
> without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package
> manager.

Two points with this - firstly if (like me) you DON'T have an MS
account, this fingerprint is not stored anywhere so that won't work.
Secondly, the fingerprint is likely stored on the hard drive somewhere
so if you clone the hard drive you are hopefully good, and thirdly it's
possible that the new hard drive will break the fingerprint so you're
SOL whatever you do. However, in that last case, if you ring the
licencing help line they MAY give you a new code because it is, still,
technically the same laptop.

Cheers,
Wol


I don't mean to continue the windows discussion on the gentoo list, but I wanted to point out that this is incorrect

I don't have a microsoft account at all, and regularly reactivate Windows 10 Home / Pro using the hardware fingerprint method using completely clean installations on factory-new harddrives with existing hardware. The fingerprint is stored on Microsoft's activation servers somewhere. I don't know how it works beyond that it's not required that you have a Microsoft account to use it.
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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mick-10
On Wednesday, 8 January 2020 07:43:16 GMT Michael Jones wrote:

> On Wed, Jan 8, 2020 at 1:01 AM Wols Lists <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > On 06/01/20 19:55, Michael Jones wrote:
> > > As for windows 10 licensing, don't trust me on this blindly, but your
> > > license should be tied to the hardware fingerprint of the laptop. So
> > > even installing windows fresh on your new SSD should result in Windows
> > > activating automatically. In fact, you might want to take this
> > > opportunity to try that out, to get a completely fresh installation
> > > without the decade of old cruft built up by window's lack of a package
> > > manager.
> >
> > Two points with this - firstly if (like me) you DON'T have an MS
> > account, this fingerprint is not stored anywhere so that won't work.
> > Secondly, the fingerprint is likely stored on the hard drive somewhere
> > so if you clone the hard drive you are hopefully good, and thirdly it's
> > possible that the new hard drive will break the fingerprint so you're
> > SOL whatever you do. However, in that last case, if you ring the
> > licencing help line they MAY give you a new code because it is, still,
> > technically the same laptop.
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Wol
>
> I don't mean to continue the windows discussion on the gentoo list, but I
> wanted to point out that this is incorrect
I think a few things mentioned in this thread run the risk of being incorrect,
after all as you hint this is not a MSWindows Activation Mailing List and our
experiences tend to accumulate on Gentoo problems.  :-)


> I don't have a microsoft account at all, and regularly reactivate Windows
> 10 Home / Pro using the hardware fingerprint method using completely clean
> installations on factory-new harddrives with existing hardware.

I expect this is because your original installation utilised a Digital License
AND you kept the same MoBo.  The UUID of the MoBo is stored on the WAP servers
and when your PC goes online it matches the Digital License ID stored on the
server.

If you did have a MS Account and linked it to your installation with its
Digital License, you would be able to install MSWindows to other hardware,
after running the Activation Troubleshooter tool and clicking on "This is the
device I’m using right now".  The only problem I am aware of is on PCs where
the Digital License was stored by the OEM within the UEFI firmware and you
want to perform an upgrade to a different MSWindows edition.  In this case,
the process is slightly different - but I am not familiar with the specifics.  
All I recall is MSWindows users screaming late at night all over the
interwebs.


> The
> fingerprint is stored on Microsoft's activation servers somewhere. I don't
> know how it works beyond that it's not required that you have a Microsoft
> account to use it.

True, as long as you stay on the same hardware (MoBo).

--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

Mick-10
In reply to this post by antlists
On Wednesday, 8 January 2020 07:13:19 GMT Wols Lists wrote:

> On 06/01/20 23:37, Mark Knecht wrote:
> > Michael,
> >
> >    I got Win 10 Pro installed via the M$ tool that creates USB install
> >
> > devices. It worked fine. Reading online it seems that if M$ sees the new
> > disk as still the same 'hardware' then it's supposed to automatically
> > validate and I'd be good to go. so far, after 2 hours it hasn't done
> > that but I'll give it awhile and see what happens. As it only took an
> > hour I might still try the disk copy path and see if that comes up
> > validated as that would also transfer the couple of applications I have
> > on the original hard drive.
> >
> >    Anyway, thanks for the ideas.
>
> A few more ideas from my experience -
>
> Have you ever re-installed windows and actually used the licence key
> that came with the laptop? No? Then try a clean install of Win10 using
> the Win7 key.
This will not work unless the upgrade from Win 7/8.1 took place before the
Microsoft imposed deadline of July 2016.


> Nearly all regular computers come with a bulk licence install, and the
> key that is actually on the sticker is usually completely unused. If you
> try to install Win10 with a Win7 key that has never been used, it will
> activate. That's how I did a clean install on my laptop. (And it's
> certainly true of Office, maybe of Win also - if you give it a key, it
> will install the version that matches the key.)

The OS Product Key for a Win 7 will not work on a Win 10, unless the free
upgrade option had been performed before July 2016.  At least it has not
worked here ...  You'll need a Product Key, Digital License, or a Microsoft
Account which has been linked to an activated Windows 10 Digital License.


> Or just buy a key from Amazon. I think I paid about £15 and had
> absolutely no trouble. I've bought a bunch of Win and Office keys off
> Amazon at between £10 and £20 and they've all installed no problem
> whatsoever. (Thanks to an EU legal ruling, MS cannot block the sale of
> 2nd-hand licence keys ...)

I didn't know this!  Thanks for sharing.
--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: Guidance on using Gentoo to clone a Win 10 system drive

antlists
On 08/01/20 09:26, Mick wrote:
> The OS Product Key for a Win 7 will not work on a Win 10, unless the free
> upgrade option had been performed before July 2016.  At least it has not
> worked here ...  You'll need a Product Key, Digital License, or a Microsoft
> Account which has been linked to an activated Windows 10 Digital License.

I don't know what the date MS announced was, but this tactic certainly
worked after that - I did it myself. The key statement there is "NEVER
been used". If MS recognises the key, it will fail.

(I'm actually going to have a crack at it myself again, I've just
acquired a Win7 laptop - nice spec - that's pretty much unaltered
original so I'm guessing it's never been re-installed and the key used.)

Cheers,
Wol

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