SSD partitioning and migration

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SSD partitioning and migration

luis jure


hello list,

i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i thought it
would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the disk
(my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...

i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.

apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
the ssd?

thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
saying different things that i'm really confused.


best,


lj


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Davide De Prisco

I used ssd from workstation to server. I created partitions with fdisk and then I usually push all in with dd from the old disk. For the grub you can install it like a normal disk. If you want you can install a new system and then copy the home directory. The only directory that you can put on a normal disk is the portage's temp compiling dir. I saw on the WWW that someone are still working to a new filesystem that can be better to use with the ssd but I never test it.
Good work.....
Davide

Il giorno 18/lug/2013 23:23, "luis jure" <[hidden email]> ha scritto:


hello list,

i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i thought it
would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the disk
(my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...

i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.

apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
the ssd?

thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
saying different things that i'm really confused.


best,


lj


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

luis jure
on 2013-07-18 at 23:40 Davide De Prisco wrote:


> I created partitions with fdisk and then I usually push all in with dd
> from the old disk. For the grub you can install it like a normal disk.

did you use GPT or plain old MBR? so there's nothing special with grub and
gpt partitioned disks?

thanks for your answer,


lj

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Paul Hartman-3
In reply to this post by luis jure
On Thu, Jul 18, 2013 at 4:22 PM, luis jure <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> hello list,

Hi!

> i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i thought it
> would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the disk
> (my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...
>
> i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
> for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.

Sounds like a good plan. I used the same strategy here.

> apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
> should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
> the ssd?

GPT is not required, if you use MBR it should work just as well. If
you use GPT you must enable GUID partition table support in your
kernel and ensure your boot loader supports it.

> thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
> saying different things that i'm really confused.

Here are the basic steps I used for doing the same thing:

1. partition SSD (start sector at a multiple of 1MB to ensure proper alignment)
2. format new partitions using discard-capable filesystem like ext4, xfs, btrfs
3. mount them in a temporary mount point
4. rsync your filesystem from old drive to new drive
5. edit /etc/fstab on the new drive to use the new mount points
6. edit boot loader config to point to correct drive
7. install boot loader on new drive if it becomes your new boot device
8. (optionally) swap drive cables so the new drive shows up first if
it is your new boot device

Depending on whether you use UUID, labels, or device names you may not
need to change names or swap cables in your computer so drives show up
in the correct order.

Good luck :)

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

William Kenworthy
On 19/07/13 06:23, Paul Hartman wrote:

> On Thu, Jul 18, 2013 at 4:22 PM, luis jure <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>> hello list,
>
> Hi!
>
>> i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i thought it
>> would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the disk
>> (my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...
>>
>> i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
>> for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.
>
> Sounds like a good plan. I used the same strategy here.
>
>> apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
>> should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
>> the ssd?
>
> GPT is not required, if you use MBR it should work just as well. If
> you use GPT you must enable GUID partition table support in your
> kernel and ensure your boot loader supports it.
>
>> thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
>> saying different things that i'm really confused.
>
> Here are the basic steps I used for doing the same thing:
>
> 1. partition SSD (start sector at a multiple of 1MB to ensure proper alignment)
> 2. format new partitions using discard-capable filesystem like ext4, xfs, btrfs
> 3. mount them in a temporary mount point
> 4. rsync your filesystem from old drive to new drive
> 5. edit /etc/fstab on the new drive to use the new mount points
> 6. edit boot loader config to point to correct drive
> 7. install boot loader on new drive if it becomes your new boot device
> 8. (optionally) swap drive cables so the new drive shows up first if
> it is your new boot device
>
> Depending on whether you use UUID, labels, or device names you may not
> need to change names or swap cables in your computer so drives show up
> in the correct order.
>
> Good luck :)
>

Apple laptop (ssd only) - boot, swap and /.  btrfs, very fast and stable
but only gets light use.

Storage server for data and VM's with an (intel) ssd for boot, swap and
OS with data on WD 2G green drives (ceph cluster).  btrfs was a
disaster, etx4 is holding up ok but being an ssd I cant use reiserfs
which is my first choice, particularly where a filesystem gets hammered.
 I tried a number of configurations and the ceph journals are a lot
faster on ssd, and swap on ssd is also a big speedup (including
hibernate/resume).  Been running for few months now.

With the apple I dont get a choice where to put swap (which even with 8G
ram gets used) but tests between the server ssd and a 10000rpm spinner
sees the ssd win hands down most of the time.  The ceph journals are
definitely slower on spinner ... but did seem less prone to disaster.

My main point is ssd's are fast, but make sure you have good backups if
you are stressing them :)

BillK



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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

luis jure
In reply to this post by Paul Hartman-3
on 2013-07-18 at 17:23 Paul Hartman wrote:


> Hi!

hi paul, thanks for your detailed answer!

> 1. partition SSD (start sector at a multiple of 1MB to ensure proper
> alignment) 2. format new partitions using discard-capable filesystem
> like ext4, xfs, btrfs
yes and yes (using ext4)


> 4. rsync your filesystem from old drive to new drive
yes, i found some info on that. i'm at that right now.


> 5. edit /etc/fstab on the new drive to use the new mount points
yes, i'm using labels, so that part is easy.


> 6. edit boot loader config to point to correct drive
> 7. install boot loader on new drive if it becomes your new boot device
well, it's been a long time since i last installed a new system... i'll
have to re-check the docs about that.


best,


lj

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Davide De Prisco
In reply to this post by luis jure



2013/7/19 luis jure <[hidden email]>
on 2013-07-18 at 23:40 Davide De Prisco wrote:


> I created partitions with fdisk and then I usually push all in with dd
> from the old disk. For the grub you can install it like a normal disk.

did you use GPT or plain old MBR? so there's nothing special with grub and
gpt partitioned disks?

thanks for your answer,


lj

Sorry, I usually use MBR....

Davide
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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Dale-46
In reply to this post by luis jure
luis jure wrote:

>
> hello list,
>
> i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i thought it
> would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the disk
> (my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...
>
> i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
> for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.
>
> apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
> should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
> the ssd?
>
> thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
> saying different things that i'm really confused.
>
>
> best,
>
>
> lj
>
>
>


Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?

Dale

:-)  :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Alan McKinnon-2
On 19/07/2013 08:56, Dale wrote:

> luis jure wrote:
>>
>> hello list,
>>
>> i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i
>> thought it
>> would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the
>> disk
>> (my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...
>>
>> i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
>> for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.
>>
>> apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
>> should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
>> the ssd?
>>
>> thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
>> saying different things that i'm really confused.
>>
>>
>> best,
>>
>>
>> lj
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?


Why not?

/home is the most frequently-read directory on most systems, and SSD is
ideal for that.

If you are concerned about wear-levelling, /home is not the danger point


--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Dale-46
Alan McKinnon wrote:

> On 19/07/2013 08:56, Dale wrote:
>> luis jure wrote:
>>> hello list,
>>>
>>> i want to migrate my system, currently in a HD, to a new SSD. i
>>> thought it
>>> would be easy, but i decided to read a little before partitioning the
>>> disk
>>> (my first SDD) and now i'm really confused...
>>>
>>> i intend to have only two partitions in the SSD: one for / and the other
>>> for /home. i have another HD for storage, where i'm going to put swap.
>>>
>>> apparently it's better to use a GPT partitioning. are there any catches i
>>> should take into account? what about grub, can i just install it later on
>>> the ssd?
>>>
>>> thanks for any comment or pointers, i found so many different "guides"
>>> saying different things that i'm really confused.
>>>
>>>
>>> best,
>>>
>>>
>>> lj
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?
>
> Why not?
>
> /home is the most frequently-read directory on most systems, and SSD is
> ideal for that.
>
> If you are concerned about wear-levelling, /home is not the danger point
>
>

Interesting.  I'm not sure I would want mine on a SSD even if it would
fit on one.  The only part that might help would be my .kde and .mozilla
directory.

I'm going to get me one of these things one of these days tho.  I almost
got one a while back that was on sale but they had sold out. :/

Dale

:-)  :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Neil Bothwick
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 03:22:11 -0500, Dale wrote:

> >> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?  
> >
> > Why not?
> >
> > /home is the most frequently-read directory on most systems, and SSD
> > is ideal for that.
> >
> > If you are concerned about wear-levelling, /home is not the danger
> > point

> Interesting.  I'm not sure I would want mine on a SSD even if it would
> fit on one.  The only part that might help would be my .kde
> and .mozilla directory.

SSDs are not like USB flash drives, and it's been years since I managed
to wear one of those out (mainly due to a kernel bug). They have
lifetimes similar to spinny disks these days.


--
Neil Bothwick

If you got the words it does not mean you got the knowledge.

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Dale-46
Neil Bothwick wrote:

> On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 03:22:11 -0500, Dale wrote:
>
>>>> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?
>>> Why not?
>>>
>>> /home is the most frequently-read directory on most systems, and SSD
>>> is ideal for that.
>>>
>>> If you are concerned about wear-levelling, /home is not the danger
>>> point
>> Interesting.  I'm not sure I would want mine on a SSD even if it would
>> fit on one.  The only part that might help would be my .kde
>> and .mozilla directory.
> SSDs are not like USB flash drives, and it's been years since I managed
> to wear one of those out (mainly due to a kernel bug). They have
> lifetimes similar to spinny disks these days.
>
>

Now I really feel about better getting one.  That was my concern and
reason for the question.  I'm sure /home gets its share of reads and
writes and was thinking the writes would cause a problem over time.
Maybe they are better now than they was a while back.

Thanks for the update.

Dale

:-)  :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Randolph Maaßen
2013/7/19 Dale <[hidden email]>

>
> Neil Bothwick wrote:
>>
>> On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 03:22:11 -0500, Dale wrote:
>>
>>>>> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?
>>>>
>>>> Why not?
>>>>
>>>> /home is the most frequently-read directory on most systems, and SSD
>>>> is ideal for that.
>>>>
>>>> If you are concerned about wear-levelling, /home is not the danger
>>>> point
>>>
>>> Interesting.  I'm not sure I would want mine on a SSD even if it would
>>> fit on one.  The only part that might help would be my .kde
>>> and .mozilla directory.
>>
>> SSDs are not like USB flash drives, and it's been years since I managed
>> to wear one of those out (mainly due to a kernel bug). They have
>> lifetimes similar to spinny disks these days.
>>
>>
>
> Now I really feel about better getting one.  That was my concern and reason for the question.  I'm sure /home gets its share of reads and writes and was thinking the writes would cause a problem over time. Maybe they are better now than they was a while back.
>
> Thanks for the update.
>
>
> Dale
>
> :-)  :-)
>
> --
> I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!
>
>

I came across the topic of SSD writes when setting up my laptop with
an ssd and the question, is a tmpfs vor /var/tmp/portage or swapfile
on SSD a good idea? At some point I found this at ArchWiki page about
SSDs[1], but I don't know how up to date or correct this is.

"A 32GB SSD with a mediocre 10x write amplification factor, a standard
10000 write/erase cycle, and 10GB of data written per day, would get
an 8 years life expectancy. It gets better with bigger SSDs and modern
controllers with less write amplification."

Now I have /var/tmp/portage on tmpfs and a swapfile on the SSD, but I
think the drive will last for the next years so i don't have to worry
much about it.

[1] https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives

--
Mit freundlichen Grüßen / Best regards

Randolph Maaßen

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Helmut Jarausch
On 07/19/2013 11:33:33 AM, Randolph Maaßen wrote:
> 2013/7/19 Dale <[hidden email]>
> >
> > Neil Bothwick wrote:
> >> SSDs are not like USB flash drives, and it's been years since I  
> managed
> >> to wear one of those out (mainly due to a kernel bug). They have
> >> lifetimes similar to spinny disks these days.

Perhaps this recent thread makes it clearer :
http://tech.slashdot.org/story/13/02/19/1326239/taking-a-hard-look-at-ssd-write-endurance

Helmut


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Paul Hartman-3
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Fri, Jul 19, 2013 at 1:56 AM, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?

My first step into SSD on my desktop was to put everything-but-home
onto it. I left home on a HDD. Speedup was very noticeable! Especially
portage-related things were very much faster (accessing thousands of
small files).

I later added a second SSD for home, but kept the old HDD for huge
directories like photos, videos, downloads, ISOs/virtual disk images,
Steam games folder, etc. There was honestly not a very appreciable
speedup from adding the home SSD, in my opinion. But that probably
depends highly on individual usage patterns.

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

luis jure
In reply to this post by Dale-46
on 2013-07-19 at 01:56 Dale wrote:

> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?

well, not actually the whole /home, the SSD is too small for that. i'm not
sure yet, i might keep /home on a HDD and mount the partition on the SSD as
a directory under /home for some special uses. or the other way around...

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Dale-46
luis jure wrote:
> on 2013-07-19 at 01:56 Dale wrote:
>
>> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?
> well, not actually the whole /home, the SSD is too small for that. i'm not
> sure yet, i might keep /home on a HDD and mount the partition on the SSD as
> a directory under /home for some special uses. or the other way around...
>
>


Size was one issue I thought of but I was more concerned with the wear
and tear part but that was explained by others.  It seems that is not as
much a issue any more.

At one time, I had a /data directory.  I stored large stuff there:
camera pics, videos, audio stuff and such.  If you put /home on SSD, you
could always put the larger stuff on another mount point.  One thing
about Linux, you can mount stuff wherever you want.

Post back how it works out and any speed improvements you see.  I'm
really curious since I would like to get one that is at least big enough
for the OS itself.  My /home is over 1Tb, that is Tb too. I'm not buying
one big enough for all that.  lol

Dale

:-)  :-)

--
I am only responsible for what I said ... Not for what you understood or how you interpreted my words!


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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Bruce Hill, Jr.
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Fri, Jul 19, 2013 at 03:55:37AM -0500, Dale wrote:
>
> Now I really feel about better getting one.  That was my concern and
> reason for the question.  I'm sure /home gets its share of reads and
> writes and was thinking the writes would cause a problem over time.
> Maybe they are better now than they was a while back.
>
> Thanks for the update.
>
> Dale

The OCZs I've purchased have 3-5 year warranty, also. Most of the mechanical
hard drives you purchase today only have one year. I won't buy any SATA
mechanical drives except Hitachi.
--
Happy Penguin Computers               >')
126 Fenco Drive                       ( \
Tupelo, MS 38801                       ^^
[hidden email]
662-269-2706 662-205-6424
http://happypenguincomputers.com/

A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.                                                                                                                                                          
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?                                                                                                                                                                                        
A: Top-posting.                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Q: What is the most annoying thing in e-mail?

Don't top-post: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_post#Top-posting

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Mick-10
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Friday 19 Jul 2013 17:43:39 Dale wrote:

> luis jure wrote:
> > on 2013-07-19 at 01:56 Dale wrote:
> >> Do you really want to put /home on a SSD?
> >
> > well, not actually the whole /home, the SSD is too small for that. i'm
> > not sure yet, i might keep /home on a HDD and mount the partition on the
> > SSD as a directory under /home for some special uses. or the other way
> > around...
>
> Size was one issue I thought of but I was more concerned with the wear
> and tear part but that was explained by others.  It seems that is not as
> much a issue any more.
>
> At one time, I had a /data directory.  I stored large stuff there:
> camera pics, videos, audio stuff and such.  If you put /home on SSD, you
> could always put the larger stuff on another mount point.  One thing
> about Linux, you can mount stuff wherever you want.
>
> Post back how it works out and any speed improvements you see.  I'm
> really curious since I would like to get one that is at least big enough
> for the OS itself.  My /home is over 1Tb, that is Tb too. I'm not buying
> one big enough for all that.  lol
>
> Dale
>
> :-)  :-)
I have a MUCH smaller /home than Dale and on a new box I was thinking of
having it on a HDD, along with all things portage related.  I typically resync
3 -4 times a week but I am not sure how much erase/write cycles this
represents.  Also, /home is written all the time with mail and various
application profile folders, browser cache and what have you.  That's why I
was thinking that /usr/portage, /var/tmp/portage, /var/log, /home and /swap
were candidates for HDD.

I guess the rest under / does not change that often and a weekly or even
monthly back up would be all that is necessary to facilitate recovery when the
SSD dies on me.

Am I being too cautious with current technology SSDs?

BTW, unless anyone advises differently, I was thinking of buying a SanDisk
Extreme II, SATA III, 2.5" 240GB SSD.  I read that its SLC cache improves
speed and reliability, but I don't know if true.

--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: SSD partitioning and migration

Paul Hartman-3
In reply to this post by Bruce Hill, Jr.
On Fri, Jul 19, 2013 at 12:47 PM, Bruce Hill
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> I won't buy any SATA
> mechanical drives except Hitachi.

Hitachi's storage division was sold off and split up last year. Their
2.5" HDD and SDD lines now belong to Western Digital (who continue to
sell the *Star models under the "HGST" brand name), while their 3.5"
HDD lines now belong to Toshiba who are selling them under the Toshiba
brand name.

Toshiba never made 3.5" HDD's before, and they purchased Hitachi's
brands, designs, patents and factories relating to 3.5" HDDs. Many of
the Toshiba HDD's being sold today, in Toshiba boxes with Toshiba
labels and new model numbers, in fact still have the Hitachi brand
name and model number embedded in the chipset when you hook it up to
your computer.

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