To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
62 messages Options
1234
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Ralph Seichter-4
https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712.html

This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).

-Ralph

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Adam Carter
On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:53 AM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]> wrote:
https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712.html

This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).

Turning on ipv6 has been on my agenda for a while, but I will need to setup a firewall. Currently i have a single ipv4 NAT box with some port forwards. However, when i enable v6, all my internal hosts become directly routable from the Internet via the /56 my ISP assigns me.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Dale-46
Adam Carter wrote:
On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:53 AM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]> wrote:
https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712.html

This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).

Turning on ipv6 has been on my agenda for a while, but I will need to setup a firewall. Currently i have a single ipv4 NAT box with some port forwards. However, when i enable v6, all my internal hosts become directly routable from the Internet via the /56 my ISP assigns me.


I have a question about this.  I've read about this for ages and sort of get the idea, running out of numbers basically.  There's two questions that I can't answer tho.  I have a old Linksys router, the old blue thing that is so common.  Would I have to buy a new router?  I also have a older DSL modem, it's a old Westell black box.  Would this require a newer modem as well?  I'm thinking those boxes would have to have software at least that would support the newer addresses but nothing I've read really answers those questions.  I don't know if they even update software on those old things. 

Thoughts??

Dale

:-)  :-) 
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Wols Lists
On 26/11/19 15:16, Dale wrote:

> Adam Carter wrote:
>> On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:53 AM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]
>> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>     https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712.html
>>
>>     This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
>>     point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
>>     move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).
>>
>>
>> Turning on ipv6 has been on my agenda for a while, but I will need to
>> setup a firewall. Currently i have a single ipv4 NAT box with some
>> port forwards. However, when i enable v6, all my internal hosts become
>> directly routable from the Internet via the /56 my ISP assigns me.
>
>
> I have a question about this.  I've read about this for ages and sort of
> get the idea, running out of numbers basically.  There's two questions
> that I can't answer tho.  I have a old Linksys router, the old blue
> thing that is so common.  Would I have to buy a new router?  I also have
> a older DSL modem, it's a old Westell black box.  Would this require a
> newer modem as well?  I'm thinking those boxes would have to have
> software at least that would support the newer addresses but nothing
> I've read really answers those questions.  I don't know if they even
> update software on those old things.
>
Go into the admin screen on the router. Look at where you configure
IPv4, and see if there's a section on configuring IPv6.

If that's not there, then you need a firmware upgrade, which may or may
not be available, or you might be able to install Open-WRT or whatever
it's called now.

Cheers,
Wol


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Mick-10
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 15:16:24 GMT Dale wrote:

> Adam Carter wrote:
> > On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:53 AM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]
> >
> > <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
> >     https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712
> >     .html
> >    
> >     This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
> >     point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
> >     move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).
> >
> > Turning on ipv6 has been on my agenda for a while, but I will need to
> > setup a firewall. Currently i have a single ipv4 NAT box with some
> > port forwards. However, when i enable v6, all my internal hosts become
> > directly routable from the Internet via the /56 my ISP assigns me.
>
> I have a question about this.  I've read about this for ages and sort of
> get the idea, running out of numbers basically.  There's two questions
> that I can't answer tho.  I have a old Linksys router, the old blue
> thing that is so common.  Would I have to buy a new router?  
Yes.  You will need a router which has an IPv6 network stack on it, besides
the legacy IPv4 network stack, to be able to route IPv6 addresses directly
from your LAN.

Depending on how useful your ISP is, they may offer IPv6 tunneling over IPv4.  
You connect to their gateway/proxy over IPv4 as you do now with your existing
router, but route through the IPv4 tunnel your IPv6 connections.  Their
gateway will act as an endpoint for your IPv4 tunnel and forward your IPv6
packets to the IPv6 interwebs.  It is likely they will only do this after they
have a good sniff at them, but in this age of universal surveillance such an
activity won't be something surprising.


> I also have
> a older DSL modem, it's a old Westell black box.  Would this require a
> newer modem as well?  

If this is an ADSL modem only (i.e. no PPP negotiation or NAT'ing - a.k.a.
'Fully Bridged Mode') then it is using ATM encapsulation.  IPv4 or IPv6
packets from your LAN will be encapsulated into ATM frames by your modem and
sent to the telephone exchange over copper wires.  There is no need to change
your modem in this case.

However, if your modem is operating in a 'Half-Bridged mode' then it is
essentially performing IP masquerading plus ATM encapsulation.  In this case
it is routing ethernet - it will have to be able to manage IPv6 packets.  An
old (legacy) router will only have IPv4 stack and the previous comments apply.  
You could always set the modem in fully bridged mode, after you connect to its
management interface, and thereafter use your router to perform PPP
authentication with your ISP.  In fully bridged mode you won't need to change
your modem.


> I'm thinking those boxes would have to have
> software at least that would support the newer addresses but nothing
> I've read really answers those questions.  I don't know if they even
> update software on those old things.
>
> Thoughts??
>
> Dale
>
> :-)  :-)
You need to google for alternative linux based firmware/software for your
router and modem make and model.  However, if these are really old devices,
then their chipsets and RAM may not be adequate to allow them to run dual
network stacks without grinding to a halt.  If the OEMs never provided IPv6
capability, for these devices it could well be the case the hardware is not
capable of carrying the processing load.  
--
Regards,

Mick

signature.asc (849 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Alan Grimes
In reply to this post by Dale-46
Dale wrote:

> I have a question about this.  I've read about this for ages and sort
> of get the idea, running out of numbers basically.  There's two
> questions that I can't answer tho.  I have a old Linksys router, the
> old blue thing that is so common.  Would I have to buy a new router? 
> I also have a older DSL modem, it's a old Westell black box.  Would
> this require a newer modem as well?  I'm thinking those boxes would
> have to have software at least that would support the newer addresses
> but nothing I've read really answers those questions.  I don't know if
> they even update software on those old things. 
>
> Thoughts??


Existing routers: Unknown, depends on model/firmware, must be enabled in
settings.

Existing modems/ONTs: if operating in transparent "bridge" mode, should
be no issue, check MTU limitations/issues.

If modem is operating in lite router mode: unknown, check model.

My ISP is barely fit for a third world country, I'm running 75/75 but
strictly IPv4 only. =(((

https://www.reddit.com/r/verizon/comments/dydm3n/does_verizon_fios_support_ipv6_yet/

--
Clowns feed off of funny money;
Funny money comes from the FED
so NO FED -> NO CLOWNS!!!

Powers are not rights.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Dale-46
In reply to this post by Mick-10
Mick wrote:

> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 15:16:24 GMT Dale wrote:
>> Adam Carter wrote:
>>> On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:53 AM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]
>>>
>>> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>>     https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712
>>>     .html
>>>    
>>>     This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
>>>     point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
>>>     move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).
>>>
>>> Turning on ipv6 has been on my agenda for a while, but I will need to
>>> setup a firewall. Currently i have a single ipv4 NAT box with some
>>> port forwards. However, when i enable v6, all my internal hosts become
>>> directly routable from the Internet via the /56 my ISP assigns me.
>> I have a question about this.  I've read about this for ages and sort of
>> get the idea, running out of numbers basically.  There's two questions
>> that I can't answer tho.  I have a old Linksys router, the old blue
>> thing that is so common.  Would I have to buy a new router?  
> Yes.  You will need a router which has an IPv6 network stack on it, besides
> the legacy IPv4 network stack, to be able to route IPv6 addresses directly
> from your LAN.
>
> Depending on how useful your ISP is, they may offer IPv6 tunneling over IPv4.  
> You connect to their gateway/proxy over IPv4 as you do now with your existing
> router, but route through the IPv4 tunnel your IPv6 connections.  Their
> gateway will act as an endpoint for your IPv4 tunnel and forward your IPv6
> packets to the IPv6 interwebs.  It is likely they will only do this after they
> have a good sniff at them, but in this age of universal surveillance such an
> activity won't be something surprising.
>
>
>> I also have
>> a older DSL modem, it's a old Westell black box.  Would this require a
>> newer modem as well?  
> If this is an ADSL modem only (i.e. no PPP negotiation or NAT'ing - a.k.a.
> 'Fully Bridged Mode') then it is using ATM encapsulation.  IPv4 or IPv6
> packets from your LAN will be encapsulated into ATM frames by your modem and
> sent to the telephone exchange over copper wires.  There is no need to change
> your modem in this case.
>
> However, if your modem is operating in a 'Half-Bridged mode' then it is
> essentially performing IP masquerading plus ATM encapsulation.  In this case
> it is routing ethernet - it will have to be able to manage IPv6 packets.  An
> old (legacy) router will only have IPv4 stack and the previous comments apply.  
> You could always set the modem in fully bridged mode, after you connect to its
> management interface, and thereafter use your router to perform PPP
> authentication with your ISP.  In fully bridged mode you won't need to change
> your modem.
>
>
>> I'm thinking those boxes would have to have
>> software at least that would support the newer addresses but nothing
>> I've read really answers those questions.  I don't know if they even
>> update software on those old things.
>>
>> Thoughts??
>>
>> Dale
>>
>> :-)  :-)
> You need to google for alternative linux based firmware/software for your
> router and modem make and model.  However, if these are really old devices,
> then their chipsets and RAM may not be adequate to allow them to run dual
> network stacks without grinding to a halt.  If the OEMs never provided IPv6
> capability, for these devices it could well be the case the hardware is not
> capable of carrying the processing load.  


I enter my username/password on the modem so I'm pretty sure it is
processing the packets and such.  There is no mention of anything IPv4
or v6.  I'd suspect it is v4 only, since it works it has to support v4. 
lol  So, old modem may have to be bricked at some point.  I do have a
newer gray modem that came with the DSL kit.  I stopped using it because
it got so warm.  The old black box one runs cool and it has more vent
holes.  I may have to check and see if the gray one supports v6 but it
is fairly old too.  It's at least 10 years old. 

My router also makes no mention of IPv4 or v6.  I suspect it is in the
same boat as the modem, it doesn't support it and doesn't have the
option to either.  I did go to the Linksys website and look for a
firmware upgrade, nothing available, not even a old one. 

I did some searching for routers with ipv6 support.  I'm not finding a
lot.  Is this something I need to worry about yet?  I mean, is there a
lot of IPv6 equipment even available right now? 

Thanks to all for the info.  Both had good info that helped.  Water
isn't quite as muddy as it was.

Dale

:-)  :-) 

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Daniel Frey-6
In reply to this post by Ralph Seichter-4
On 2019-11-25 06:53, Ralph Seichter wrote:
> https://www.ripe.net/ripe/mail/archives/ripe-list/2019-November/001712.html
>
> This does not come as a surprise, of course, but I consider it a good
> point in time to pause and ask oneself what each individual can do to
> move further towards IPv6. The end is neigh(ish).
>
> -Ralph
>

Can't do anything, ipv6 is completely disabled (removed from kernel
config.) Current ISP will not issue any ipv6 if an ipv4 static is required.

ipv4 works just fine....

Dan


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Mick-10
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 17:58:46 GMT Dale wrote:

> I enter my username/password on the modem so I'm pretty sure it is
> processing the packets and such.  There is no mention of anything IPv4
> or v6.  I'd suspect it is v4 only, since it works it has to support v4.
> lol  So, old modem may have to be bricked at some point.

Not necessarily.  If your modem is like the one described here, follow the
guidance provided to set it in bridged mode:

https://www.dslreports.com/faq/6405

In bridged mode it will pass all ethernet packets to your router and your
router will be able to obtain a public IP address with its dhcp client
directly from your ISP.  Of course, to be able to connect to your ISP you will
now need to enter your ADSL account username/passwd into the PPPoE (or PPPoA)
client in your router's management interface.  DHCP and DNS server
functionality will also be provided by your router for all devices on your
LAN.  The modem will be just a dumb box between the ISP and your router.

In the unlikely chance your router does not possess such PPP authentication
functionality, you will have to replace your router with one which does and at
the same time look to buy one which offers IPv6 too.


> I do have a
> newer gray modem that came with the DSL kit.  I stopped using it because
> it got so warm.  The old black box one runs cool and it has more vent
> holes.  I may have to check and see if the gray one supports v6 but it
> is fairly old too.  It's at least 10 years old.

ADSL ATM encapsulation technology has not changed for many years now.  I don't
think age (or colour) matters really, unless you can see smoke coming out of
it when you power it up!  LOL!


> My router also makes no mention of IPv4 or v6.  I suspect it is in the
> same boat as the modem, it doesn't support it and doesn't have the
> option to either.  I did go to the Linksys website and look for a
> firmware upgrade, nothing available, not even a old one.

You haven't provided any model names[1] so it's difficult to google things for
you, or suggest solutions.  Have a look here to see if your router is still
supported by this open source Linux firmware:

https://openwrt.org/supported_devices

https://openwrt.org/toh/start

Other alternative(s):

http://www.polarcloud.com/tomato


> I did some searching for routers with ipv6 support.  I'm not finding a
> lot.  Is this something I need to worry about yet?  I mean, is there a
> lot of IPv6 equipment even available right now?

You may have not tried hard enough.  There were a thing even 8 years ago:

https://www.cnet.com/news/top-5-ipv6-ready-wireless-routers/

Answering your question, yes, today all modern routers and any ADSL modems
with routing capability come as dual IPv4/6 stack.


[1] True story:  Years ago a friend started work in a car accessories and
spare parts shop.  Customer walks in looking for spark plugs, where upon my
friend asks for his make and model.  Customer replies:  "Dunno, it's a blue
car ..."  O_O

--
Regards,

Mick

signature.asc (849 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Dale-46
Mick wrote:

> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 17:58:46 GMT Dale wrote:
>
>> I enter my username/password on the modem so I'm pretty sure it is
>> processing the packets and such.  There is no mention of anything IPv4
>> or v6.  I'd suspect it is v4 only, since it works it has to support v4.
>> lol  So, old modem may have to be bricked at some point.
> Not necessarily.  If your modem is like the one described here, follow the
> guidance provided to set it in bridged mode:
>
> https://www.dslreports.com/faq/6405
>
> In bridged mode it will pass all ethernet packets to your router and your
> router will be able to obtain a public IP address with its dhcp client
> directly from your ISP.  Of course, to be able to connect to your ISP you will
> now need to enter your ADSL account username/passwd into the PPPoE (or PPPoA)
> client in your router's management interface.  DHCP and DNS server
> functionality will also be provided by your router for all devices on your
> LAN.  The modem will be just a dumb box between the ISP and your router.
>
> In the unlikely chance your router does not possess such PPP authentication
> functionality, you will have to replace your router with one which does and at
> the same time look to buy one which offers IPv6 too.
>
>

I'm almost certain my router can do this.  I've done it before but with
a wired only version.  I think they have the same basic firmware since
all the screens look alike, except for the wireless part being added. 
Thing is, I don't think the router has IPv6 capabilities.  It's a WRT54G
version 6 that I use now.  I switched to a wireless one when I got my
cell phone which needs wi-fi.  The old wired router was the same model
less the G on the end if I recall correctly.  I suspect a new router is
due, age and lack of firmware updates if nothing else.  I think the
firmware is about a decade old. 


>> I do have a
>> newer gray modem that came with the DSL kit.  I stopped using it because
>> it got so warm.  The old black box one runs cool and it has more vent
>> holes.  I may have to check and see if the gray one supports v6 but it
>> is fairly old too.  It's at least 10 years old.
> ADSL ATM encapsulation technology has not changed for many years now.  I don't
> think age (or colour) matters really, unless you can see smoke coming out of
> it when you power it up!  LOL!
>

I mention the color because some may remember the old thing.  When I see
a black Westell, I know what it is.  Heck, I found most of the ones I
got at a thrift store for $6.00.  lol  I can generally recognize the
gray ones BUT some look a lot alike but are different on the inside. 

>> My router also makes no mention of IPv4 or v6.  I suspect it is in the
>> same boat as the modem, it doesn't support it and doesn't have the
>> option to either.  I did go to the Linksys website and look for a
>> firmware upgrade, nothing available, not even a old one.
> You haven't provided any model names[1] so it's difficult to google things for
> you, or suggest solutions.  Have a look here to see if your router is still
> supported by this open source Linux firmware:
>
> https://openwrt.org/supported_devices
>
> https://openwrt.org/toh/start
>
> Other alternative(s):
>
> http://www.polarcloud.com/tomato
>

Model is above.  I've read about openwrt but always been nervous about
trying it.  I've read where some have bricked their router.  You know me
and my luck.  If it can be bricked, I can do it, real good.  LOL  ;-D  I
tried to find out how much memory and such my old router has but I can't
find it anywhere.  It may not show it so I may end up googling for it
online.  See if I can find a spec sheet somewhere. 

>> I did some searching for routers with ipv6 support.  I'm not finding a
>> lot.  Is this something I need to worry about yet?  I mean, is there a
>> lot of IPv6 equipment even available right now?
> You may have not tried hard enough.  There were a thing even 8 years ago:
>
> https://www.cnet.com/news/top-5-ipv6-ready-wireless-routers/
>
> Answering your question, yes, today all modern routers and any ADSL modems
> with routing capability come as dual IPv4/6 stack.
>
>
> [1] True story:  Years ago a friend started work in a car accessories and
> spare parts shop.  Customer walks in looking for spark plugs, where upon my
> friend asks for his make and model.  Customer replies:  "Dunno, it's a blue
> car ..."  O_O
>


I just did one quick search for 'wireless router IPv6' and didn't see a
lot.  However, it may not be finding them all since it may not be in the
description since new ones come with it by default.  In other words,
they don't include IPv6 in the description for it to find it.  I'll do
some more searching but I'll ask here before I buy one unless it
specifically says it supports IPv6 somewhere.  No point buying one just
like I got now.  :/ 

I just don't want to wait until my internet stops working right to
upgrade this stuff. 

Dale

:-)  :-) 

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Ralph Seichter-4
In reply to this post by Daniel Frey-6
* Daniel Frey:

> Can't do anything, ipv6 is completely disabled (removed from kernel
> config.)

A search for "linux kernel enable ipv6" just returned more than 1.7
million results.

> Current ISP will not issue any ipv6 if an ipv4 static is required.

My current ISP offers native IPv6 and has been doing so for years.
While choice varies across different countries, IPv6 availability has
increased considerably over the last 10 years, which is why SiXXs.net
has discontinued services[1] mid 2017. Even a small amount of searching
should turn up a decent ISP in most industrialized countries.

[1] https://www.sixxs.net/sunset/

> ipv4 works just fine....

Maybe our ancestors should never have come down from the trees. Perhaps
even leaving the oceans was a dumb move. ;-)

Seriously, IPv4 may appear to work "just fine" for you, but there is a
lot of nasty stuff like NAT going on under the hood. IPv6 means a lot
less hassle if you have a decent ISP and a halfway modern router.

It will take a while longer before the lack of free IPv4 addresses
becomes too profound to ignore even for private users, but users with
more advanced needs already feel the squeeze. My recommendation is to
pick a proper ISP and select a proper router when the current one has
lived out its life (or maybe a firmware update suffices). The higher the
customers' demand for IPv6, the more incentive there is for ISPs and
router manufacturers to get cracking.

-Ralph

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Ralph Seichter-4
In reply to this post by Adam Carter
* Adam Carter:

> when i enable v6, all my internal hosts become directly routable from
> the Internet via the /56 my ISP assigns me.

Even pretty anemic hardware can handle the demands of an IPv6 firewall,
for example using iptables/nftables. The demands of IPV6-related
processing should actually be a bit lower than for IPv4, because IPv6
does not need NAT.

-Ralph

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Rich Freeman
In reply to this post by Ralph Seichter-4
On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 6:41 PM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> My current ISP offers native IPv6 and has been doing so for years.
> While choice varies across different countries, IPv6 availability has
> increased considerably over the last 10 years, which is why SiXXs.net
> has discontinued services[1] mid 2017. Even a small amount of searching
> should turn up a decent ISP in most industrialized countries.
>

Uh, at least in the US most ISPs serve a particular geographic area,
and most areas have 1-2 to choose from.  Well, unless you want to pay
to actually run a dedicated line to your house.  So either you deal
with the consumer-oriented services available in your area, or you
move to an area that has better options.  I can't imagine that most
people would move for IPv6.

I just hope the local telecoms support IPv6 properly before they go so
far as to start doing carrier-grade NAT...

--
Rich

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Mick-10
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 23:14:32 GMT Dale wrote:

> Mick wrote:
> > On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 17:58:46 GMT Dale wrote:
> >> I enter my username/password on the modem so I'm pretty sure it is
> >> processing the packets and such.  There is no mention of anything IPv4
> >> or v6.  I'd suspect it is v4 only, since it works it has to support v4.
> >> lol  So, old modem may have to be bricked at some point.
> >
> > Not necessarily.  If your modem is like the one described here, follow the
> > guidance provided to set it in bridged mode:
> >
> > https://www.dslreports.com/faq/6405
> >
> > In bridged mode it will pass all ethernet packets to your router and your
> > router will be able to obtain a public IP address with its dhcp client
> > directly from your ISP.  Of course, to be able to connect to your ISP you
> > will now need to enter your ADSL account username/passwd into the PPPoE
> > (or PPPoA) client in your router's management interface.  DHCP and DNS
> > server functionality will also be provided by your router for all devices
> > on your LAN.  The modem will be just a dumb box between the ISP and your
> > router.
> >
> > In the unlikely chance your router does not possess such PPP
> > authentication
> > functionality, you will have to replace your router with one which does
> > and at the same time look to buy one which offers IPv6 too.
>
> I'm almost certain my router can do this.  I've done it before but with
> a wired only version.  I think they have the same basic firmware since
> all the screens look alike, except for the wireless part being added.
> Thing is, I don't think the router has IPv6 capabilities.  It's a WRT54G
> version 6 that I use now.  I switched to a wireless one when I got my
> cell phone which needs wi-fi.  The old wired router was the same model
> less the G on the end if I recall correctly.  I suspect a new router is
> due, age and lack of firmware updates if nothing else.  I think the
> firmware is about a decade old.
>
> >> I do have a
> >> newer gray modem that came with the DSL kit.  I stopped using it because
> >> it got so warm.  The old black box one runs cool and it has more vent
> >> holes.  I may have to check and see if the gray one supports v6 but it
> >> is fairly old too.  It's at least 10 years old.
> >
> > ADSL ATM encapsulation technology has not changed for many years now.  I
> > don't think age (or colour) matters really, unless you can see smoke
> > coming out of it when you power it up!  LOL!
>
> I mention the color because some may remember the old thing.  When I see
> a black Westell, I know what it is.  Heck, I found most of the ones I
> got at a thrift store for $6.00.  lol  I can generally recognize the
> gray ones BUT some look a lot alike but are different on the inside.
>
> >> My router also makes no mention of IPv4 or v6.  I suspect it is in the
> >> same boat as the modem, it doesn't support it and doesn't have the
> >> option to either.  I did go to the Linksys website and look for a
> >> firmware upgrade, nothing available, not even a old one.
> >
> > You haven't provided any model names[1] so it's difficult to google things
> > for you, or suggest solutions.  Have a look here to see if your router is
> > still supported by this open source Linux firmware:
> >
> > https://openwrt.org/supported_devices
> >
> > https://openwrt.org/toh/start
> >
> > Other alternative(s):
> >
> > http://www.polarcloud.com/tomato
>
> Model is above.  I've read about openwrt but always been nervous about
> trying it.  I've read where some have bricked their router.  You know me
> and my luck.  If it can be bricked, I can do it, real good.  LOL  ;-D  I
> tried to find out how much memory and such my old router has but I can't
> find it anywhere.  It may not show it so I may end up googling for it
> online.  See if I can find a spec sheet somewhere.
Ahh ... OK.  Try to flog it on flea-bay and buy something more powerful.  
WRT54G v5/6 routers were crippled by Linksys compared to previous models.  
They come with minuscules amounts of RAM - 8MB, half that of previous models
and also half the flash disk - 2MB:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linksys_WRT54G_series#Hardware_revisions

The only firmware which will run on them is DD-WRT, but I'm not sure it's
worth the hassle.  Get rid of it and buy a newer device with more flash and
RAM on it.

https://wiki.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Linksys_WRT54G_v5.0_%26_5.1_%26_6.0


> I just did one quick search for 'wireless router IPv6' and didn't see a
> lot.  However, it may not be finding them all since it may not be in the
> description since new ones come with it by default.  In other words,
> they don't include IPv6 in the description for it to find it.  I'll do
> some more searching but I'll ask here before I buy one unless it
> specifically says it supports IPv6 somewhere.  No point buying one just
> like I got now.  :/
>
> I just don't want to wait until my internet stops working right to
> upgrade this stuff.
>
> Dale
>
> :-)  :-)
May be worth buying something which is (currently) supported by OpenWRT.  
Their website and wiki make various hardware recommendations.

https://openwrt.org/toh/views/toh_available_864


There are also a number of Linux firewall projects if you want to repurpose an
old PC with more than one NIC and use that as a firewall/router.
--
Regards,

Mick

signature.asc (849 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Dale-46
Mick wrote:

> On Tuesday, 26 November 2019 23:14:32 GMT Dale wrote:
>
> May be worth buying something which is (currently) supported by OpenWRT.  
> Their website and wiki make various hardware recommendations.
>
> https://openwrt.org/toh/views/toh_available_864
>
>
> There are also a number of Linux firewall projects if you want to repurpose an
> old PC with more than one NIC and use that as a firewall/router.


I went to Newegg.  Hey, I buy stuff there sometimes.  Anyway, I've
looked at several routers and none of them mention IPv6 that I can
find.  I even skimmed the reviews and can't find a mention of it.  Is
there some secret way to know when IPv6 is supported?  Is it called
something else maybe? 

I went to your link for Openwrt.  I found Linksys E2500 in the list. 
When I go search for one, ebay etc, I then find E2500-NP with N600 also
mentioned.  Some even say E2500 and E2500-NP in the same description.  I
think the N600 has something to do with the wireless stuff.  If I want
to use Openwrt, does the -NP make any difference?  The link doesn't
mention the -NP version.  The N600 affect anything?  I'm trying to get a
dual band version since my current cell phone supports both I think but
if I get a new cell phone, it may want the other band, N I think it is
called.  :/

One thing I like about the old blue thing.  It has quite a few LEDs on
the front.  It's easy for me to see when data is moving even from across
the room.  The newer black ones have lights but only on the back from
what I can see.  I'm going to miss those LEDs.  :-( 

So far, I like the E2500 and found a couple at a good price, on ebay but
I think they are new.  Also want to research the wireless range.  I
ended up having to move my printer closer to the router, in the kitchen
on top of the microwave at the moment.  The signal just wouldn't make it
to the far room all the time.  I saw one, Openwrt doesn't support it,
that can go several hundred feet.  I haven't looked at the E2500, yet. 

Oh, for anyone else wanting to know of their Linksys router supports
IPv6.  On the menu, select Setup, then look for IPv6 Setup between Basic
Setup and DDNS in the lower tabs.  If it doesn't show up there, it
doesn't support IPv6.  I ran up on that somewhere.  Maybe that will help
someone else who knows as little as I do about this thing.  LOL 

Dale

:-)  :-) 

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Rich Freeman
On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 8:10 PM Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I went to Newegg.  Hey, I buy stuff there sometimes.  Anyway, I've
> looked at several routers and none of them mention IPv6 that I can
> find.  I even skimmed the reviews and can't find a mention of it.  Is
> there some secret way to know when IPv6 is supported?  Is it called
> something else maybe?
>

IMO there are three reasonable approaches you can take towards getting
a router you won't curse yourself for buying a year from now:

1.  DIY.  PC or other general-purpose computing hardware with multiple
NICs.  There are SBCs that work well for this.  You can run pfsense or
some other router-oriented distro/software/wrappers.  Or you can just
roll your own with netfilter and such.  Max flexibility, but also max
fuss.  Unless you use a SBC you'll also be paying a price in
electricity.  Don't underestimate how much you pay for any x86-based
system that runs 24x7 - especially anything old you have lying around.

2.  OpenWRT/DD-WRT/etc.  Again it is a bit fussy but generally way
less so than going pure DIY unless you're running pfsense or some
other appliance-oriented distro.  If you go this route then definitely
check for recommendations on hardware that is known to work WELL.
Some stuff technically works but can be very prone to having to play
around with JTAG and such if you make the slightest mistake.  You'll
probably spend an extra $20 on hardware you won't regret buying - do
it.

3.  Something commercial that isn't terrible.  There are various
options, but everybody always points to Ubiquiti and I'm mostly happy
with them.  If you want something that is more gui-based I'd go with
their Unifi line.  I'd avoid Amplifi as it is more consumer-oriented
and you'll end up being frustrated with it.  EdgeOS is getting closer
to something like OpenWRT - it runs linux and you can get a shell and
mess around with the CLI.  However, while the EdgeOS routing options
are great they aren't so good with WiFi and EdgeOS and Unifi don't
interoperate all that well (not impossible, but they don't really talk
to each other so you have to maintain two configs).  I also really
dislike that the EdgeOS management software is only supplied as a
docker image, which is a pain if you're not using docker (one of these
days I'll have to get it working with my bridge interface as it always
tries to create its own and ends up having no physical network
access).  The Unifi controller software is packaged for a couple of
distros which makes it much more flexible to deploy (and you can use
it on docker if you wish).

Personally I'm running EdgeOS on my router and Unifi on everything
else.  If I could go back I might have gone with Unifi on the gateway
but it does bug me that it is so much more expensive and does the same
thing.  If I had it then end-to-end VLAN/etc would be much more
practical, though I'd need a pile of managed switches to make it work
well.

I've run all three options at various points.  Unless your needs are
special I think there is value in just going with #3.  It just runs
itself for the most part, and if you want multiple access points or
anything like that the network basically runs itself.  I just plug in
new hardware and then on the controller software it shows up, and one
click provisions it which configures it to fit in with all my global
settings.

--
Rich

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Dale-46
Rich Freeman wrote:

> On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 8:10 PM Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> I went to Newegg.  Hey, I buy stuff there sometimes.  Anyway, I've
>> looked at several routers and none of them mention IPv6 that I can
>> find.  I even skimmed the reviews and can't find a mention of it.  Is
>> there some secret way to know when IPv6 is supported?  Is it called
>> something else maybe?
>>
> IMO there are three reasonable approaches you can take towards getting
> a router you won't curse yourself for buying a year from now:
>
> 1.  DIY.  PC or other general-purpose computing hardware with multiple
> NICs.  There are SBCs that work well for this.  You can run pfsense or
> some other router-oriented distro/software/wrappers.  Or you can just
> roll your own with netfilter and such.  Max flexibility, but also max
> fuss.  Unless you use a SBC you'll also be paying a price in
> electricity.  Don't underestimate how much you pay for any x86-based
> system that runs 24x7 - especially anything old you have lying around.

I remember how my old rig pulled power.  It pulled like 400 watts or so
idle.  Of course, it was lacking in power so when compiling, there
wasn't a lot of difference really.  In the winter, I rarely needed a
heater.  Its constant heat output kept this bedroom comfy.  No real need
for a heater.  It's one reason I want to avoid this option.  Mostly, I
want something I'll get many years of service from and everything work
well, wired or wireless now that I have a cell phone and printer that
needs it.  My current router pulls like 10 watts or something. 
Considering I run electric heat and such, it's a rounding error for me. 
Heck, my main puter is too.  It pulls like 180 watts which includes
everything, modem, router, monitor and the rig itself. 

The positive part tho for option 1, if another port is needed, just add
a network card and it's done.  With DHCP and friends, it will likely
just work.  That's something you can't do with a store bought router. 
Whatever it comes with, that's what you got.  I've never needed more
than the 4 most come with tho.  My puter uses one, printer another and
cell phone.  I guess I have one left still. 


> 2.  OpenWRT/DD-WRT/etc.  Again it is a bit fussy but generally way
> less so than going pure DIY unless you're running pfsense or some
> other appliance-oriented distro.  If you go this route then definitely
> check for recommendations on hardware that is known to work WELL.
> Some stuff technically works but can be very prone to having to play
> around with JTAG and such if you make the slightest mistake.  You'll
> probably spend an extra $20 on hardware you won't regret buying - do
> it.


That's what I'm wanting as a option.  I may just use the firmware that
comes with the thing for a good while.  Later on tho, if needed, I may
switch to Openwrt or some other option that may work better.  It's a
option I'd like to have if possible. 


> 3.  Something commercial that isn't terrible.  There are various
> options, but everybody always points to Ubiquiti and I'm mostly happy
> with them.  If you want something that is more gui-based I'd go with
> their Unifi line.  I'd avoid Amplifi as it is more consumer-oriented
> and you'll end up being frustrated with it.  EdgeOS is getting closer
> to something like OpenWRT - it runs linux and you can get a shell and
> mess around with the CLI.  However, while the EdgeOS routing options
> are great they aren't so good with WiFi and EdgeOS and Unifi don't
> interoperate all that well (not impossible, but they don't really talk
> to each other so you have to maintain two configs).  I also really
> dislike that the EdgeOS management software is only supplied as a
> docker image, which is a pain if you're not using docker (one of these
> days I'll have to get it working with my bridge interface as it always
> tries to create its own and ends up having no physical network
> access).  The Unifi controller software is packaged for a couple of
> distros which makes it much more flexible to deploy (and you can use
> it on docker if you wish).
>
> Personally I'm running EdgeOS on my router and Unifi on everything
> else.  If I could go back I might have gone with Unifi on the gateway
> but it does bug me that it is so much more expensive and does the same
> thing.  If I had it then end-to-end VLAN/etc would be much more
> practical, though I'd need a pile of managed switches to make it work
> well.
>
> I've run all three options at various points.  Unless your needs are
> special I think there is value in just going with #3.  It just runs
> itself for the most part, and if you want multiple access points or
> anything like that the network basically runs itself.  I just plug in
> new hardware and then on the controller software it shows up, and one
> click provisions it which configures it to fit in with all my global
> settings.
>


This is why I might buy one compatible with Openwrt but wait until the
wireless stuff gets sorted out.  Like I said above, I'd like it as a
option so finding one that Openwrt supports should increase my odds if
they get everything working nicely later on.  I still remember the old
USB days when it was new.  It was buggy and stuff didn't work right
every time.  After a while tho, they got most the kinks worked out.  I
think Openwrt and others will do the same.  It may take a bit but maybe
by the time I'm ready to try it, it will be awesomeness. 

I just want to avoid replacing my current router with a router that also
doesn't have IPv6 support and has limited options later on.  Even google
isn't helping me much on that. 

Thanks.

Dale

:-)  :-) 

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Tamer Higazi
In reply to this post by Rich Freeman
In europe it's a bit different.
My gentoo client runs in dual stack mode so my server does as well.

I have ipv4 and ipv6 enabled and get 2 ip addresses from my ISP.

of course i have 2 firewall rules, iptables and ip6tables. But why not.....

works out of the box.



On 2019-11-27 01:09, Rich Freeman wrote:

> On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 6:41 PM Ralph Seichter <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> My current ISP offers native IPv6 and has been doing so for years.
>> While choice varies across different countries, IPv6 availability has
>> increased considerably over the last 10 years, which is why SiXXs.net
>> has discontinued services[1] mid 2017. Even a small amount of searching
>> should turn up a decent ISP in most industrialized countries.
>>
> Uh, at least in the US most ISPs serve a particular geographic area,
> and most areas have 1-2 to choose from.  Well, unless you want to pay
> to actually run a dedicated line to your house.  So either you deal
> with the consumer-oriented services available in your area, or you
> move to an area that has better options.  I can't imagine that most
> people would move for IPv6.
>
> I just hope the local telecoms support IPv6 properly before they go so
> far as to start doing carrier-grade NAT...
>

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Grant Edwards-6
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On 2019-11-27, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I went to your link for Openwrt.  I found Linksys E2500 in the list. 
> When I go search for one, ebay etc, I then find E2500-NP with N600 also
> mentioned.  Some even say E2500 and E2500-NP in the same description.  I
> think the N600 has something to do with the wireless stuff.  If I want
> to use Openwrt, does the -NP make any difference?  The link doesn't
> mention the -NP version.  The N600 affect anything?  I'm trying to get a
> dual band version since my current cell phone supports both I think but
> if I get a new cell phone, it may want the other band, N I think it is
> called.  :/

The TP-Link Archer C7 runs openwrt flawlessly:

  https://www.bestbuy.com/site/tp-link-archer-ac1750-dual-band-wi-fi-5-router-black/5889900.p?skuId=5889900

A couple months ago when I was shopping, there was also a newer A7
version.  That still requires a bleeding edge version of OpenWRT.  So
I opted for the older hardware just to be safe.

The Linksys WRT3200ACM claims to be designed to run OpenWRT, but I had
constant problems with it and finally gave up.

For OpenWRT, the usual advice is to avoid Broadcom hardware: the
driver support is close-source and rather marginal.



Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: To all IPv6-slackers among the Gentoo community

Dale-46
Grant Edwards wrote:

> On 2019-11-27, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I went to your link for Openwrt.  I found Linksys E2500 in the list. 
>> When I go search for one, ebay etc, I then find E2500-NP with N600 also
>> mentioned.  Some even say E2500 and E2500-NP in the same description.  I
>> think the N600 has something to do with the wireless stuff.  If I want
>> to use Openwrt, does the -NP make any difference?  The link doesn't
>> mention the -NP version.  The N600 affect anything?  I'm trying to get a
>> dual band version since my current cell phone supports both I think but
>> if I get a new cell phone, it may want the other band, N I think it is
>> called.  :/
> The TP-Link Archer C7 runs openwrt flawlessly:
>
>   https://www.bestbuy.com/site/tp-link-archer-ac1750-dual-band-wi-fi-5-router-black/5889900.p?skuId=5889900
>
> A couple months ago when I was shopping, there was also a newer A7
> version.  That still requires a bleeding edge version of OpenWRT.  So
> I opted for the older hardware just to be safe.
>
> The Linksys WRT3200ACM claims to be designed to run OpenWRT, but I had
> constant problems with it and finally gave up.
>
> For OpenWRT, the usual advice is to avoid Broadcom hardware: the
> driver support is close-source and rather marginal.
>

I was planning to stick with Linksys but I'm liking the one you linked
too.  By the way, TP-Link has a store on ebay and it's cheaper there. 
Anyway, it supports IPv6 according to the manual and it has LEDs on the
front it seems.  Am I seeing LEDs or am I seeing something else?  Also,
does it have some holes on the bottom that allows wall mounting?  I'm
trying to find a picture of the bottom but so far, no luck.  I've found
pics of everything else tho. 

Going to research some more but so far, I'm kinda liking it. 

Thanks for the link.

Dale

:-)  :-) 

1234