Video database software

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Video database software

Dale-46
Howdy,

As some know, I've accumulated a lot of videos.  I googled around and
found some software but not sure based on what they claim if they will
do something I'm looking for.  I installed a couple but not real big on
how they work.  One requires me to add videos, one at a time.  I have
over 20,000 videos now.  Some are short youtube type videos, some are
long videos.  It could take me years to add them all doing it one at a
time.  Needless to say, that one didn't last long.  The biggest thing
I'm looking for, software that can tell me what videos have a low
resolution.  As a example, some videos I downloaded a long time ago have
been updated to have higher resolutions.  I may have one that is a 360P,
or even less, but I may can locate a new version that is HD or even very
HD.  I'd like software that will tell me this sort of info as well as
other nifty features as well.  Obviously, I'd like to start with the
lower resolution videos first.

So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they won't
do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it to a
directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one at
a time manually just isn't feasible at all. 

Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos by
resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that what
I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just haven't
found it yet.  ;-)

Thanks.

Dale

:-)  :-) 

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Re: Video database software

Jack
On 2019.01.28 17:54, Dale wrote:

> Howdy,
>
> As some know, I've accumulated a lot of videos.  I googled around and
> found some software but not sure based on what they claim if they will
> do something I'm looking for.  I installed a couple but not real big  
> on
> how they work.  One requires me to add videos, one at a time.  I have
> over 20,000 videos now.  Some are short youtube type videos, some are
> long videos.  It could take me years to add them all doing it one at a
> time.  Needless to say, that one didn't last long.  The biggest thing
> I'm looking for, software that can tell me what videos have a low
> resolution.  As a example, some videos I downloaded a long time ago  
> have
> been updated to have higher resolutions.  I may have one that is a  
> 360P,
> or even less, but I may can locate a new version that is HD or even  
> very
> HD.  I'd like software that will tell me this sort of info as well as
> other nifty features as well.  Obviously, I'd like to start with the
> lower resolution videos first.
>
> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they  
> won't
> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it  
> to a
> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one  
> at
> a time manually just isn't feasible at all. 
>
> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos  
> by
> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that  
> what
> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just  
> haven't
> found it yet.  ;-)
>
> Thanks.
>
> Dale
Hi Dale,

I don't know about any such program.  I use f-spot for managing my  
still photos, and it does deal with videos, although I don't know if it  
would easily allow searching/sorting by things like resolution.  Even  
worse, it is not packaged anywhere I know of, and compiling yourself  
(it's a dotnet project) is not easy, if even possible.

However, as I understand it, you want to create a list/database of all  
your videos, with all or some subset of available metadata, such as  
resolution.  Have you looked whether media-libs/exiftool extracts the  
data you need?  If so, it shouldn't be too hard to craft a tool (I  
happen to be a Perl bigot, but any similar language should be  
reasonably close in the required effort) to either put that info into a  
database (sqlite, mysql, mariadb, postgresql, ....) or even just a  
single line per video which could be read into a spreadsheet or  
libreoffice base file.

Jack
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Re: Video database software

Laurence Perkins
In reply to this post by Dale-46
On Mon, 2019-01-28 at 16:54 -0600, Dale wrote:
+AD4- Howdy,
+AD4-
+AD4- As some know, I've accumulated a lot of videos.  I googled around and
+AD4- found some software but not sure based on what they claim if they
+AD4- will
+AD4- do something I'm looking for.  I installed a couple but not real big
+AD4- on
+AD4- how they work.  One requires me to add videos, one at a time.  I have
+AD4- over 20,000 videos now.  Some are short youtube type videos, some are
+AD4- long videos.  It could take me years to add them all doing it one at
+AD4- a
+AD4- time.  Needless to say, that one didn't last long.  The biggest thing
+AD4- I'm looking for, software that can tell me what videos have a low
+AD4- resolution.  As a example, some videos I downloaded a long time ago
+AD4- have
+AD4- been updated to have higher resolutions.  I may have one that is a
+AD4- 360P,
+AD4- or even less, but I may can locate a new version that is HD or even
+AD4- very
+AD4- HD.  I'd like software that will tell me this sort of info as well as
+AD4- other nifty features as well.  Obviously, I'd like to start with the
+AD4- lower resolution videos first.
+AD4-
+AD4- So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
+AD4- others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they
+AD4- won't
+AD4- do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it
+AD4- to a
+AD4- directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one
+AD4- at
+AD4- a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
+AD4-
+AD4- Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos
+AD4- by
+AD4- resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that
+AD4- what
+AD4- I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just
+AD4- haven't
+AD4- found it yet.  +ADs--)
+AD4-
+AD4- Thanks.
+AD4-
+AD4- Dale
+AD4-
+AD4- :-)  :-)
+AD4-

Digikam might be worth a try.  It does some pretty advanced stuff with
photos and I think at this point it can do quite a bit of the sorting
and searching stuff with videos as well.  I've not tried it with videos
myself though so I can't make any promises.

LMP

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Re: Video database software

Andrew Udvare
In reply to this post by Dale-46

> On 2019-01-28, at 17:54, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they won't
> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it to a
> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one at
> a time manually just isn't feasible at all.

Seems like you could import via command line? http://wiki.gcstar.org/en/execution

You can build the database you need locally with something like exiftool or MediaInfo, or even ffmpeg https://stackoverflow.com/a/8191228/374110 . I highly doubt anyone with serious collections is building their database one item at a time.
>
> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos by
> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that what
> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just haven't
> found it yet.  ;-)

The closest thing I can think of is Kodi since it's scanner will retrieve all this information and store it in a straightforward database format. You can choose SQLite or MySQL (of course MySQL is definitely the better choice for larger collections). The downside is the scanner is very slow, especially over a network (and not optimised). The only viewer for this data (at the time being) is Kodi itself.

--
Andrew
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Re: Video database software

Dale-46
In reply to this post by Jack
Jack wrote:

> On 2019.01.28 17:54, Dale wrote:
>> Howdy,
>>
>> As some know, I've accumulated a lot of videos.  I googled around and
>> found some software but not sure based on what they claim if they will
>> do something I'm looking for.  I installed a couple but not real big on
>> how they work.  One requires me to add videos, one at a time.  I have
>> over 20,000 videos now.  Some are short youtube type videos, some are
>> long videos.  It could take me years to add them all doing it one at a
>> time.  Needless to say, that one didn't last long.  The biggest thing
>> I'm looking for, software that can tell me what videos have a low
>> resolution.  As a example, some videos I downloaded a long time ago have
>> been updated to have higher resolutions.  I may have one that is a 360P,
>> or even less, but I may can locate a new version that is HD or even very
>> HD.  I'd like software that will tell me this sort of info as well as
>> other nifty features as well.  Obviously, I'd like to start with the
>> lower resolution videos first.
>>
>> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
>> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they won't
>> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it to a
>> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one at
>> a time manually just isn't feasible at all. 
>>
>> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos by
>> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that what
>> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just haven't
>> found it yet.  ;-)
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Dale
> Hi Dale,
>
> I don't know about any such program.  I use f-spot for managing my
> still photos, and it does deal with videos, although I don't know if
> it would easily allow searching/sorting by things like resolution. 
> Even worse, it is not packaged anywhere I know of, and compiling
> yourself (it's a dotnet project) is not easy, if even possible.
>
> However, as I understand it, you want to create a list/database of all
> your videos, with all or some subset of available metadata, such as
> resolution.  Have you looked whether media-libs/exiftool extracts the
> data you need?  If so, it shouldn't be too hard to craft a tool (I
> happen to be a Perl bigot, but any similar language should be
> reasonably close in the required effort) to either put that info into
> a database (sqlite, mysql, mariadb, postgresql, ....) or even just a
> single line per video which could be read into a spreadsheet or
> libreoffice base file.
>
> Jack
>


I do currently use exiftool to get the resolution.  One, it is accurate
and true every time.  I've never had it be wrong.  I do it this way: 
exiftool <path to file > | grep size   Thing is, my scripting is basic
and that is overrating my skills.  lol  Generally, my scripting skills
consists of taking commands I use on the command line and putting them
in a text file and making it executable.  Trust me, if my life depended
on writing a true script, I'm a dead duck.  :/ 

I use digkam to manage my camera pictures and the pictures from my deer
cameras. It also will do videos from the trail cameras set to take
videos instead of pics but it seems very basic on videos.  I don't think
it even does a thumbnail for videos.  I wish it would do what I want and
I could just have one database for my camera type stuff and one for my
other video type stuff.  It also just required me to point it to the
directory with my pics when I started using it and it built its database
in just a few minutes.  One could wish but unless I'm missing something,
it doesn't do what I need with videos.  I'll look into f-spot tho.  It
may work well for my camera stuff too.  Who knows.  What package does
that come with?  I can't find a f-spot here.  Eix didn't help either. 

Thanks for the idea. 

Dale

:-)  :-) 

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Re: Video database software

Jack
On 2019.01.28 19:01, Dale wrote:
[snip.....]
> I'll look into f-spot tho.  It may work well for my camera stuff  
> too.  Who knows.  What package does that come with?  I can't find a  
> f-spot here.  Eix didn't help either. 
F-spot isn't currently packaged anywhere.  It fell into a period of  
lack of maintenance, and had too many build bugs, so most/all distros  
dropped it.  I didn't want to change, so I started figuring out how to  
build it myself.  My current version continues to work, but I have not  
been able to build a new version in over a year.  I can sometimes build  
it under other distros with more up-to-date dotnet stuff.  If I ever  
find something like a flat-pack version, I'll let you know.  If you  
really want to try, the source is at https://github.com/f-spot/f-spot

Don't underestimate your scripting abilities.  It might take learning a  
bit, but you've done that before :-)   Start with modifying your grep  
line so the path to file and grep result are on a single line, you can  
append them to a big file (one line per video with full path to video,  
the size, and some other (hopefully consistent text).  You can import  
that into a libreoffice spreadsheet.  Even if it's only one column to  
start, you can search/replace to change the static text to a comma or  
something to separate items, then to "text to columns."  Then you can  
sort.  I think LO can handle ~20K rows, but you could always  
move/convert it to LO Base (it's simple database - sort of like  
MS-Access).  Still just use the spreadsheet interface, but underneath,  
it's better able to handle the volume and sorting.
>
> Thanks for the idea. 
>
> Dale
>
>  :-)  :-) 

Jack
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Re: Video database software

Dale-46
In reply to this post by Laurence Perkins
Laurence Perkins wrote:

> On Mon, 2019-01-28 at 16:54 -0600, Dale wrote:
>> Howdy,
>>
>> As some know, I've accumulated a lot of videos.  I googled around and
>> found some software but not sure based on what they claim if they
>> will
>> do something I'm looking for.  I installed a couple but not real big
>> on
>> how they work.  One requires me to add videos, one at a time.  I have
>> over 20,000 videos now.  Some are short youtube type videos, some are
>> long videos.  It could take me years to add them all doing it one at
>> a
>> time.  Needless to say, that one didn't last long.  The biggest thing
>> I'm looking for, software that can tell me what videos have a low
>> resolution.  As a example, some videos I downloaded a long time ago
>> have
>> been updated to have higher resolutions.  I may have one that is a
>> 360P,
>> or even less, but I may can locate a new version that is HD or even
>> very
>> HD.  I'd like software that will tell me this sort of info as well as
>> other nifty features as well.  Obviously, I'd like to start with the
>> lower resolution videos first.
>>
>> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
>> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they
>> won't
>> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it
>> to a
>> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one
>> at
>> a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos
>> by
>> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that
>> what
>> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just
>> haven't
>> found it yet.  ;-)
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Dale
>>
>> :-)  :-)
>>
> Digikam might be worth a try.  It does some pretty advanced stuff with
> photos and I think at this point it can do quite a bit of the sorting
> and searching stuff with videos as well.  I've not tried it with videos
> myself though so I can't make any promises.
>
> LMP
>
>


I have and use that for pictures.+AKA- Maybe it is something recently added
that I missed.+AKA- I'll look into that some more.+AKA- Since I already use it,
it would be nice.+AKA- I just use it to track what is downloaded and what is
not so I use it as a basic tool.+AKA- I used to use gtkam, I think that is
the name.+AKA- It got a bug of some sort so I switched to digikam several
years ago.+AKA-

Thanks.

Dale

:-)+AKA- :-)+AKA-

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Re: Video database software

Laurence Perkins
In reply to this post by Dale-46


On Mon, 2019-01-28 at 18:01 -0600, Dale wrote:
+AD4-
+AD4- I do currently use exiftool to get the resolution.  One, it is
+AD4- accurate
+AD4- and true every time.  I've never had it be wrong.  I do it this way:
+AD4- exiftool +ADw-path to file +AD4- +AHw- grep size  

Assuming you're using bash as your shell then you're pretty close
already. Make it:
echo +ACIAPA-path to file+AD4-, +ACQ-(exiftool +ADw-path to file+AD4- +AHw- grep size)+ACI-

Then you just need to run that over every file and append the output to
a data file for searching.  There are a variety of ways to do that
ranging from using loops in your script to doing abominable things with
spreadsheet programs or other editors, so I leave that choice up to
you.

LMP
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Re: Video database software

Dale-46
In reply to this post by Jack
Jack wrote:

> On 2019.01.28 19:01, Dale wrote:
> [snip.....]
>> I'll look into f-spot tho.  It may work well for my camera stuff
>> too.  Who knows.  What package does that come with?  I can't find a
>> f-spot here.  Eix didn't help either. 
> F-spot isn't currently packaged anywhere.  It fell into a period of
> lack of maintenance, and had too many build bugs, so most/all distros
> dropped it.  I didn't want to change, so I started figuring out how to
> build it myself.  My current version continues to work, but I have not
> been able to build a new version in over a year.  I can sometimes
> build it under other distros with more up-to-date dotnet stuff.  If I
> ever find something like a flat-pack version, I'll let you know.  If
> you really want to try, the source is at https://github.com/f-spot/f-spot
>
> Don't underestimate your scripting abilities.  It might take learning
> a bit, but you've done that before :-)   Start with modifying your
> grep line so the path to file and grep result are on a single line,
> you can append them to a big file (one line per video with full path
> to video, the size, and some other (hopefully consistent text).  You
> can import that into a libreoffice spreadsheet.  Even if it's only one
> column to start, you can search/replace to change the static text to a
> comma or something to separate items, then to "text to columns."  Then
> you can sort.  I think LO can handle ~20K rows, but you could always
> move/convert it to LO Base (it's simple database - sort of like
> MS-Access).  Still just use the spreadsheet interface, but underneath,
> it's better able to handle the volume and sorting.
>>
>> Thanks for the idea. 
>>
>> Dale
>>
>>  :-)  :-) 
>
> Jack
>


I knew I'd heard of that before.  I didn't realize it was outdated tho. 

Trust me, my scripting is awful.  I have a script that I use to backup
my /home directory.  I wanted to add a section that will make sure the
external drive is mounted first and stop if it isn't.  I googled, found
some nifty examples.  Sort of makes sense, sort of.  Still no clue how
to make it work for me tho.  lol  So sad. 

Some things I get and can pick up fast.  Some things I can't quite grasp
no matter what I try.  Scripting seems to fall into that last category. 
It's pathetic. 

Dale

:-)  :-) 

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Re: Video database software

Dale-46
In reply to this post by Andrew Udvare
Andrew Udvare wrote:

>> On 2019-01-28, at 17:54, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
>> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they won't
>> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it to a
>> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one at
>> a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
> Seems like you could import via command line? http://wiki.gcstar.org/en/execution
>
> You can build the database you need locally with something like exiftool or MediaInfo, or even ffmpeg https://stackoverflow.com/a/8191228/374110 . I highly doubt anyone with serious collections is building their database one item at a time.
>> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos by
>> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that what
>> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just haven't
>> found it yet.  ;-)
> The closest thing I can think of is Kodi since it's scanner will retrieve all this information and store it in a straightforward database format. You can choose SQLite or MySQL (of course MySQL is definitely the better choice for larger collections). The downside is the scanner is very slow, especially over a network (and not optimised). The only viewer for this data (at the time being) is Kodi itself.
>


Not ignoring.  Just pondering this one.  May take some time for me to
test some stuff here.  ;-) 

Thanks much.

Dale

:-)  :-) 

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Re: Video database software

Mick-10
On Tuesday, 29 January 2019 02:55:02 GMT Dale wrote:

> Andrew Udvare wrote:
> >> On 2019-01-28, at 17:54, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>
> >> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
> >> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they won't
> >> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it to a
> >> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one at
> >> a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
> >
> > Seems like you could import via command line?
> > http://wiki.gcstar.org/en/execution
> >
> > You can build the database you need locally with something like exiftool
> > or MediaInfo, or even ffmpeg https://stackoverflow.com/a/8191228/374110 .
> > I highly doubt anyone with serious collections is building their database
> > one item at a time.>
> >> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos by
> >> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that what
> >> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just haven't
> >> found it yet.  ;-)
> >
> > The closest thing I can think of is Kodi since it's scanner will retrieve
> > all this information and store it in a straightforward database format.
> > You can choose SQLite or MySQL (of course MySQL is definitely the better
> > choice for larger collections). The downside is the scanner is very slow,
> > especially over a network (and not optimised). The only viewer for this
> > data (at the time being) is Kodi itself.
> Not ignoring.  Just pondering this one.  May take some time for me to
> test some stuff here.  ;-)
>
> Thanks much.
>
> Dale
>
> :-)  :-)
Installing and having to maintain Kodi just to manage a list of videos is
probably inefficient - unless you have a regular use for other Kodi
functionality.  I use it mostly for audio and also the odd video.  It has
loads of useful plugins to play with.

If Kodi is of no use, or you prefer a more portable stand alone CLI solution,
you could look into some basic bash scripts. I couldn't code my way out of a
paper bag, but here's two basic ideas to get you started.  First to list all
the videos into a csv file:

find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi' -o -iname '*.mkv' >
video_list.csv

You may have to add other types of video file containers depending on your
video collection.  As a second step, in order to list all the video
resolutions you could pass the find output to xargs:

find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi' -o -iname '*.mkv' | tee
video_list.csv | xargs -d '\n' exiftool -T -ImageSize

Given my non-existent coding skills I am not sure how to append the output of
xargs as a second column to the video_list.csv, which you could thereafter
open with localc to do your searches, or manipulate further.  Of course,
localc is not necessary.  You can always use less or grep to search the csv
file very efficiently and also re-create it quickly when you add/delete to
your videos.

Other more knowledgeable contributors should be able to polish and complete
the above, or indeed propose something different than bash (python?) to
perform the same task.

HTH.
--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: Video database software

Dale-46
Mick wrote:

> On Tuesday, 29 January 2019 02:55:02 GMT Dale wrote:
>> Andrew Udvare wrote:
>>>> On 2019-01-28, at 17:54, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling for
>>>> others but some either are not in the tree or I already know they won't
>>>> do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to point it to a
>>>> directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding them one at
>>>> a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
>>> Seems like you could import via command line?
>>> http://wiki.gcstar.org/en/execution
>>>
>>> You can build the database you need locally with something like exiftool
>>> or MediaInfo, or even ffmpeg https://stackoverflow.com/a/8191228/374110 .
>>> I highly doubt anyone with serious collections is building their database
>>> one item at a time.>
>>>> Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of videos by
>>>> resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be that what
>>>> I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I just haven't
>>>> found it yet.  ;-)
>>> The closest thing I can think of is Kodi since it's scanner will retrieve
>>> all this information and store it in a straightforward database format.
>>> You can choose SQLite or MySQL (of course MySQL is definitely the better
>>> choice for larger collections). The downside is the scanner is very slow,
>>> especially over a network (and not optimised). The only viewer for this
>>> data (at the time being) is Kodi itself.
>> Not ignoring.  Just pondering this one.  May take some time for me to
>> test some stuff here.  ;-)
>>
>> Thanks much.
>>
>> Dale
>>
>> :-)  :-)
> Installing and having to maintain Kodi just to manage a list of videos is
> probably inefficient - unless you have a regular use for other Kodi
> functionality.  I use it mostly for audio and also the odd video.  It has
> loads of useful plugins to play with.


I see the point but wouldn't mind having some software that I could use
to search for other things as well.  As I mentioned, I have thousands of
videos.  While I have some organized and easy enough to find, I have a
lot of them that I wish I could do keyword searches on.  Just as a
example.  If I'm about to work on my washing machine, I could search for
washing machine and find any videos I have on my washing machine, or
washing machines in general for that matter. I mention that because my
little twisty thingy in the middle isn't twisting anymore.  They claim
there is a ratcheting like thing in there that needs replacing.  ;-) 
I've got to find out how to get to it, what to order etc etc before
tearing it apart.  Videos help with that if one can find it among the
thousands I have.  o_O


>
> If Kodi is of no use, or you prefer a more portable stand alone CLI solution,
> you could look into some basic bash scripts. I couldn't code my way out of a
> paper bag, but here's two basic ideas to get you started.  First to list all
> the videos into a csv file:
>
> find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi' -o -iname '*.mkv' >
> video_list.csv
>
> You may have to add other types of video file containers depending on your
> video collection.  As a second step, in order to list all the video
> resolutions you could pass the find output to xargs:
>
> find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi' -o -iname '*.mkv' | tee
> video_list.csv | xargs -d '\n' exiftool -T -ImageSize
>
> Given my non-existent coding skills I am not sure how to append the output of
> xargs as a second column to the video_list.csv, which you could thereafter
> open with localc to do your searches, or manipulate further.  Of course,
> localc is not necessary.  You can always use less or grep to search the csv
> file very efficiently and also re-create it quickly when you add/delete to
> your videos.
>
> Other more knowledgeable contributors should be able to polish and complete
> the above, or indeed propose something different than bash (python?) to
> perform the same task.
>
> HTH.


Even your command line knowledge surpasses mine by a large margin.  I've
got "&", "&&", and the "|" pretty well figured out.  I use grep but
based on how others use it, I'm doing it the wrong way as well, or at
least the harder/longer way.  I read about that tee command once years
ago.  If my Mom ever gets better and I have some free time, I'm going to
find a howto for complete idiots, so I can start from scratch which is
where I am, at best.  ROFL  My age isn't helping this much.  Sort of
getting to be a old dog.  :/

I'm saving this and will try to analyze it as I can.  I spent most of
the day rounding up meds for my Mom.  Doctor in one town, pharmacy in
another plus waiting. 

Thanks much.

Dale

:-)  :-) 

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Re: Video database software

Laurence Perkins
In reply to this post by Mick-10


On Tue, 2019-01-29 at 17:57 +-0000, Mick wrote:
+AD4 On Tuesday, 29 January 2019 02:55:02 GMT Dale wrote:
+AD4 +AD4 Andrew Udvare wrote:
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 On 2019-01-28, at 17:54, Dale +ADw-rdalek1967+AEA-gmail.com+AD4 wrote:
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 for
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 others but some either are not in the tree or I already know
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 they won't
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 point it to a
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 them one at
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 Seems like you could import via command line?
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 http://wiki.gcstar.org/en/execution
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 You can build the database you need locally with something like
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 exiftool
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 or MediaInfo, or even ffmpeg https://stackoverflow.com/a/8191228/
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 374110 .
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 I highly doubt anyone with serious collections is building their
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 database
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 one item at a time.+AD4
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 videos by
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 that what
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 just haven't
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 +AD4 found it yet.  +ADs--)
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 The closest thing I can think of is Kodi since it's scanner will
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 retrieve
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 all this information and store it in a straightforward database
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 format.
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 You can choose SQLite or MySQL (of course MySQL is definitely the
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 better
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 choice for larger collections). The downside is the scanner is
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 very slow,
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 especially over a network (and not optimised). The only viewer
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 for this
+AD4 +AD4 +AD4 data (at the time being) is Kodi itself.
+AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 Not ignoring.  Just pondering this one.  May take some time for me
+AD4 +AD4 to
+AD4 +AD4 test some stuff here.  +ADs--)
+AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 Thanks much.
+AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 Dale
+AD4 +AD4
+AD4 +AD4 :-)  :-)
+AD4
+AD4 Installing and having to maintain Kodi just to manage a list of
+AD4 videos is
+AD4 probably inefficient - unless you have a regular use for other Kodi
+AD4 functionality.  I use it mostly for audio and also the odd video.  It
+AD4 has
+AD4 loads of useful plugins to play with.
+AD4
+AD4 If Kodi is of no use, or you prefer a more portable stand alone CLI
+AD4 solution,
+AD4 you could look into some basic bash scripts. I couldn't code my way
+AD4 out of a
+AD4 paper bag, but here's two basic ideas to get you started.  First to
+AD4 list all
+AD4 the videos into a csv file:
+AD4
+AD4 find . -xtype f -iname '+ACo.mp4' -o -iname '+ACo.avi' -o -iname '+ACo.mkv' +AD4
+AD4 video+AF8-list.csv
+AD4
+AD4 You may have to add other types of video file containers depending on
+AD4 your
+AD4 video collection.  As a second step, in order to list all the video
+AD4 resolutions you could pass the find output to xargs:
+AD4
+AD4 find . -xtype f -iname '+ACo.mp4' -o -iname '+ACo.avi' -o -iname '+ACo.mkv' +AHw
+AD4 tee
+AD4 video+AF8-list.csv +AHw xargs -d '+AFw-n' exiftool -T -ImageSize
+AD4
+AD4 Given my non-existent coding skills I am not sure how to append the
+AD4 output of
+AD4 xargs as a second column to the video+AF8-list.csv, which you could
+AD4 thereafter
+AD4 open with localc to do your searches, or manipulate further.  Of
+AD4 course,
+AD4 localc is not necessary.  You can always use less or grep to search
+AD4 the csv
+AD4 file very efficiently and also re-create it quickly when you
+AD4 add/delete to
+AD4 your videos.
+AD4
+AD4 Other more knowledgeable contributors should be able to polish and
+AD4 complete
+AD4 the above, or indeed propose something different than bash (python?)
+AD4 to
+AD4 perform the same task.
+AD4
+AD4 HTH.


Nah, bash works fine and is less verbose when interacting with system
utilities.  

To meld it all together use a for loop:

+ACMAIQ /bin/bash
+ACM-Top line lets you save it as a file and run it if you want.
+ACM-Or you can run it a line at a time in your shell.  Bash isn't picky.
IFS+AD0AIg
+ACI  +ACM-This bit tells it to only count new lines as new entries.  
   +ACM-It's only necessary if your file names have spaces in them.

+ACM-This assumes all your videos have proper file extensions.  If
+ACM-not then you'll want to make use of the +ACI-file+ACI utility to determine
+ACM-the type of your files and use grep to sort out which ones are
+ACM-videos and then run that list through the for loop instead.
for VIDEO in +ACQ(find . -xtype f -iname '+ACo.mp4' -o -iname '+ACo.avi'+AFw
                -o -iname '+ACo.mkv')+ADs do
  +ACM-Things in +ACQ() get run and their stdout gets stuffed into the
  +ACM-command line at that point. +ACQAewB9 is how you insert variable values.
  echo +ACIAJAB7-VIDEO+AH0,+ACQ(exiftool -T -ImageSize '+ACQAew-VIDEO+AH0')+ACI
done

The bit with the backslashes at the end of the lines makes it not count
the newline as the end of a command so it will hopefully go through the
mail without getting too mangled.  You should be able puzzle out how to
fix it if it does.


LMP

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Re: Video database software

Mick-10
On Wednesday, 30 January 2019 16:06:41 GMT Laurence Perkins wrote:

> On Tue, 2019-01-29 at 17:57 +0000, Mick wrote:
> > On Tuesday, 29 January 2019 02:55:02 GMT Dale wrote:
> > > Andrew Udvare wrote:
> > > > > On 2019-01-28, at 17:54, Dale <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > So far, I have installed Griffith and GCStar.  I been googling
> > > > > for
> > > > > others but some either are not in the tree or I already know
> > > > > they won't
> > > > > do one thing I'd like to see.  I'd also like to be able to
> > > > > point it to a
> > > > > directory and let it build the database on its own.  Adding
> > > > > them one at
> > > > > a time manually just isn't feasible at all.
> > > >
> > > > Seems like you could import via command line?
> > > > http://wiki.gcstar.org/en/execution
> > > >
> > > > You can build the database you need locally with something like
> > > > exiftool
> > > > or MediaInfo, or even ffmpeg https://stackoverflow.com/a/8191228/
> > > > 374110 .
> > > > I highly doubt anyone with serious collections is building their
> > > > database
> > > > one item at a time.>
> > > >
> > > > > Does anyone know of a software package that will sort a lot of
> > > > > videos by
> > > > > resolution as well as track other things as well?  It could be
> > > > > that what
> > > > > I'd like to have doesn't exist at all.  Then again, maybe I
> > > > > just haven't
> > > > > found it yet.  ;-)
> > > >
> > > > The closest thing I can think of is Kodi since it's scanner will
> > > > retrieve
> > > > all this information and store it in a straightforward database
> > > > format.
> > > > You can choose SQLite or MySQL (of course MySQL is definitely the
> > > > better
> > > > choice for larger collections). The downside is the scanner is
> > > > very slow,
> > > > especially over a network (and not optimised). The only viewer
> > > > for this
> > > > data (at the time being) is Kodi itself.
> > >
> > > Not ignoring.  Just pondering this one.  May take some time for me
> > > to
> > > test some stuff here.  ;-)
> > >
> > > Thanks much.
> > >
> > > Dale
> > >
> > > :-)  :-)
> >
> > Installing and having to maintain Kodi just to manage a list of
> > videos is
> > probably inefficient - unless you have a regular use for other Kodi
> > functionality.  I use it mostly for audio and also the odd video.  It
> > has
> > loads of useful plugins to play with.
> >
> > If Kodi is of no use, or you prefer a more portable stand alone CLI
> > solution,
> > you could look into some basic bash scripts. I couldn't code my way
> > out of a
> > paper bag, but here's two basic ideas to get you started.  First to
> > list all
> > the videos into a csv file:
> >
> > find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi' -o -iname '*.mkv' >
> > video_list.csv
> >
> > You may have to add other types of video file containers depending on
> > your
> > video collection.  As a second step, in order to list all the video
> > resolutions you could pass the find output to xargs:
> >
> > find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi' -o -iname '*.mkv' |
> > tee
> > video_list.csv | xargs -d '\n' exiftool -T -ImageSize
> >
> > Given my non-existent coding skills I am not sure how to append the
> > output of
> > xargs as a second column to the video_list.csv, which you could
> > thereafter
> > open with localc to do your searches, or manipulate further.  Of
> > course,
> > localc is not necessary.  You can always use less or grep to search
> > the csv
> > file very efficiently and also re-create it quickly when you
> > add/delete to
> > your videos.
> >
> > Other more knowledgeable contributors should be able to polish and
> > complete
> > the above, or indeed propose something different than bash (python?)
> > to
> > perform the same task.
> >
> > HTH.
>
> Nah, bash works fine and is less verbose when interacting with system
> utilities.
>
> To meld it all together use a for loop:
>
> #! /bin/bash
> #Top line lets you save it as a file and run it if you want.
> #Or you can run it a line at a time in your shell.  Bash isn't picky.
> IFS="
> "  #This bit tells it to only count new lines as new entries.
>    #It's only necessary if your file names have spaces in them.
>
> #This assumes all your videos have proper file extensions.  If
> #not then you'll want to make use of the "file" utility to determine
> #the type of your files and use grep to sort out which ones are
> #videos and then run that list through the for loop instead.
> for VIDEO in $(find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi'\
>                 -o -iname '*.mkv'); do
>   #Things in $() get run and their stdout gets stuffed into the
>   #command line at that point. ${} is how you insert variable values.
>   echo "${VIDEO},$(exiftool -T -ImageSize '${VIDEO}')"
> done
>
> The bit with the backslashes at the end of the lines makes it not count
> the newline as the end of a command so it will hopefully go through the
> mail without getting too mangled.  You should be able puzzle out how to
> fix it if it does.
>
>
> LMP
I was thinking sed or awk could be used to build two or more columns in CSV,
but the IFS bash variable is a neater way to achieve the same. Thanks LMP!  
:-)

Note:  your script will only work here correctly when I remove the 'single
quotes' from the last $VIDEO entry in the penultimate line above.


@Dale:  Given your use case I assume the video filename will be enough, but
other exif header tags can be used too, by adding to the above script (check
man exiftool).
--
Regards,
Mick

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Re: Video database software

David Haller-5
In reply to this post by Laurence Perkins
Hello,

On Wed, 30 Jan 2019, Laurence Perkins wrote:
>for VIDEO in $(find . -xtype f -iname '*.mp4' -o -iname '*.avi'\
>                -o -iname '*.mkv'); do
>  #Things in $() get run and their stdout gets stuffed into the
>  #command line at that point. ${} is how you insert variable values.
>  echo "${VIDEO},$(exiftool -T -ImageSize '${VIDEO}')"
>done

====
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use File::Find;
use Image::ExifTool;
use Encode;

my $exifTool = new Image::ExifTool;

sub wanted {
    if( -f $_ && $_ =~ /^.*\.(?:mp4|mkv|avi)\z/si ) {
        my $ii = $exifTool->ImageInfo($File::Find::name);
        printf("%s,%s\n", $File::Find::name,
          Encode::decode_utf8($ii->{ImageSize}) );
    }
}
scalar @ARGV || push(@ARGV, '.');
File::Find::find({wanted => \&wanted, no_chdir => 1}, @ARGV );
====

Usage: $script [FILES_OR_DIRS...]

HTH,
-dnh

--
>> This needs quotes:
>> use lib "/path/to/perl/modules";
> Single or double quotes?
Yes.                     -- Tad McClellan in comp.lang.perl.misc