fixing fstab

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fixing fstab

Mark-55
I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!

-
Mark
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Re: fixing fstab

John Jolet
you don't even need to chroot. just mount / on /mnt/gentoo, etc  
should be there, edit the file and sync;unmount; reboot

On Nov 14, 2005, at 2:58 PM, Mark wrote:

> I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
> boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
> to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
> re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
>
> -
> Mark
> [unwieldy legal disclaimer would go here - feel free to type your own]
>
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Re: fixing fstab

Petteri Räty
In reply to this post by Mark-55
Mark wrote:
> I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
> boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
> to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
> re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!

You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to another
editor if you like.

Regards,
Petteri

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Re: fixing fstab

Dale-6
In reply to this post by Mark-55
Mark wrote:

>I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
>boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
>to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
>re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
>
>-
>Mark
>[unwieldy legal disclaimer would go here - feel free to type your own]
>
>  
>
To just change the fstab, boot the CD, mount the root partition then
nano -w /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab should do it.  Assuming you mounted to
/mnt/gentoo like in the install.

You should NOT have to chroot or anything to do that.  Make sure you do
the -w option on nano.  I didn't the other day and it booted but it gave
me a lot of errors.  It put the 0 0 on the very end on the next line.

Dale

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Re: fixing fstab

Mark-55
In reply to this post by Petteri Räty
Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
  mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo

Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls

all I see is boot and lost+found

Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?

On 11/14/05, Petteri Räty <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Mark wrote:
> > I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
> > boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
> > to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
> > re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
>
> You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
> execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to another
> editor if you like.
>
> Regards,
> Petteri
>
>
>


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Re: fixing fstab

Renat Golubchyk
On Mon, 14 Nov 2005 16:23:41 -0500 Mark <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
>   mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
>
> Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls
>
> all I see is boot and lost+found
>
> Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?

What is the output of "fdisk -l /dev/hda"?

Cheers,
Renat


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Re: fixing fstab

John Jolet
In reply to this post by Mark-55

On Nov 14, 2005, at 3:23 PM, Mark wrote:

> Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
>   mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
>
> Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls
>
> all I see is boot and lost+found
>
you sure /dev/hda3 is your correct partition?

> Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?
>
> On 11/14/05, Petteri Räty <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Mark wrote:
>>> I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I  
>>> can't
>>> boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I  
>>> have
>>> to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
>>> re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
>>
>> You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
>> execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to another
>> editor if you like.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Petteri
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Mark
> [unwieldy legal disclaimer would go here - feel free to type your own]
>
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Re: fixing fstab

Mariusz Pekala-2
In reply to this post by Mark-55
On 2005-11-14 16:23:41 -0500 (Mon, Nov), Mark wrote:
> Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
>   mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
>
> Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls
>
> all I see is boot and lost+found
>
> Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?
>

Just pick another partition I suppose.

fdisk -l /dev/hda

will tell you which ones are on your disk.

Mount each of them (if they are of suitable type - it's of no use to
mount your swap partition) and see what is there.

As /dev/hda3 is usually the root partition, and you have /boot there
then you may have your root on /dev/hda1 (it would have to be really big
boot...) or on some other one.

HTH

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Re: fixing fstab

allan gottlieb
In reply to this post by Mark-55
(I prefer bottom posting but am following the prev poster.)

I looks as though you had /boot on a separate partition from / (in you
new install).

So instead of

    mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo

you need

    mount /dev/hdax /mnt/gentoo

where x is 1 or 2 or whichever partition you used for /.

HTH,
allan

At Mon, 14 Nov 2005 16:23:41 -0500 Mark <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
>   mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
>
> Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls
>
> all I see is boot and lost+found
>
> Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?
>
> On 11/14/05, Petteri Räty <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Mark wrote:
>> > I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
>> > boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
>> > to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
>> > re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
>>
>> You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
>> execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to another
>> editor if you like.

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Re: fixing fstab

John Jolet

On Nov 14, 2005, at 3:43 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:

> (I prefer bottom posting but am following the prev poster.)
>
> I looks as though you had /boot on a separate partition from / (in you
> new install).
>
> So instead of
>
>     mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
>
> you need
>
>     mount /dev/hdax /mnt/gentoo
>
> where x is 1 or 2 or whichever partition you used for /.
>
umm, did I miss a memo?
  he was trying to fix fstab, which is in /etc, not /boot.

> HTH,
> allan
>
> At Mon, 14 Nov 2005 16:23:41 -0500 Mark <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
>>   mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
>>
>> Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls
>>
>> all I see is boot and lost+found
>>
>> Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?
>>
>> On 11/14/05, Petteri Räty <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> Mark wrote:
>>>> I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I  
>>>> can't
>>>> boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will  
>>>> I have
>>>> to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I  
>>>> have to
>>>> re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do).  
>>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>> You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
>>> execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to  
>>> another
>>> editor if you like.
>
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Re: fixing fstab

Mark-55
In reply to this post by John Jolet
hmmm. I think I'll start over on this one. I must have gone astray in
the instructions somewhere. Thanks for trying to help guys!

Mark

On 11/14/05, John Jolet <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Nov 14, 2005, at 3:23 PM, Mark wrote:
>
> > Well, I thought so too. So I booted to the Universal CD. Then I did
> >   mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
> >
> > Then I did cd /mnt/gentoo and did a ls
> >
> > all I see is boot and lost+found
> >
> you sure /dev/hda3 is your correct partition?
>
> > Did I make a bigger mess than I thought?
> >
> > On 11/14/05, Petteri Räty <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >> Mark wrote:
> >>> I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I
> >>> can't
> >>> boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I
> >>> have
> >>> to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
> >>> re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
> >>
> >> You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
> >> execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to another
> >> editor if you like.
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >> Petteri
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Mark
> > [unwieldy legal disclaimer would go here - feel free to type your own]
> >
> > --
> > [hidden email] mailing list
> >
>
>
> --
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>
>


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Re: fixing fstab

darren kirby
In reply to this post by John Jolet
quoth the John Jolet:

> On Nov 14, 2005, at 3:43 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
> > (I prefer bottom posting but am following the prev poster.)
> >
> > I looks as though you had /boot on a separate partition from / (in you
> > new install).
> >
> > So instead of
> >
> >     mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
> >
> > you need
> >
> >     mount /dev/hdax /mnt/gentoo
> >
> > where x is 1 or 2 or whichever partition you used for /.
>
> umm, did I miss a memo?
>   he was trying to fix fstab, which is in /etc, not /boot.
Right, which is why Allen said to mount whichever partition is '/', rather
than /boot. Read his post again ;)

-d
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"...the number of UNIX installations has grown to 10, with more expected..."
- Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson, June 1972

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Re: fixing fstab

John Jolet
On Monday 14 November 2005 16:54, darren kirby wrote:

> quoth the John Jolet:
> > On Nov 14, 2005, at 3:43 PM, Allan Gottlieb wrote:
> > > (I prefer bottom posting but am following the prev poster.)
> > >
> > > I looks as though you had /boot on a separate partition from / (in you
> > > new install).
> > >
> > > So instead of
> > >
> > >     mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
> > >
> > > you need
> > >
> > >     mount /dev/hdax /mnt/gentoo
> > >
> > > where x is 1 or 2 or whichever partition you used for /.
> >
> > umm, did I miss a memo?
> >   he was trying to fix fstab, which is in /etc, not /boot.
>
> Right, which is why Allen said to mount whichever partition is '/', rather
> than /boot. Read his post again ;)

my bad.  Misunderstood what he was saying.
>
> -d

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Re: fixing fstab

Nick Rout
In reply to this post by Petteri Räty

On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 17:13:15 -0800 (PST)
Bryan Whitehead wrote:

> I still don't understand the logic of not having vi installed by default
> over nano...


easier for newbies.


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Re: fixing fstab

John Jolet
In reply to this post by Petteri Räty
On Tuesday 15 November 2005 19:13, Bryan Whitehead wrote:
> I still don't understand the logic of not having vi installed by default
> over nano...
amen, brother.

>
> On Mon, 14 Nov 2005, Petteri Räty wrote:
> > Mark wrote:
> >> I made a mistake while creating my fstab on a new install, and I can't
> >> boot. If I use my Universal CD to boot up, what command(s) will I have
> >> to run to get access to the fstab to fix it? (I'm assuming I have to
> >> re-mount & chroot but I don't know specifically what to do). Thanks!
> >
> > You only need to mount your root partition to /mnt/gentoo and then
> > execute nano /mnt/gentoo/etc/fstab -w. You can change nano to another
> > editor if you like.
> >
> > Regards,
> > Petteri

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Re: fixing fstab

Eric Bliss
In reply to this post by Petteri Räty
On Tuesday 15 November 2005 05:13 pm, Bryan Whitehead wrote:
> I still don't understand the logic of not having vi installed by default
> over nano...
>

Ummm....  Maybe because it's so dirt simple to figure out that you don't need
to have a manual on how to use it when you first get started?  I mean,
there's a lot to be said for having an onscreen reference for how to invoke
commands.  vi and emacs are both POWERFUL, but they aren't very friendly to
someone who doesn't use them often enough to know the commands by heart.

I know I should learn emacs and vi, but it's always just easier to pop open
nano (or pico) real fast and make changes there.  And if I'm doing anything
larger, I'm using Kate or something else like it.  Or if I'm on a Windoze
machine, Crimson Editor or something similar.

While you can get versions of vi and emacs for Windoze, they aren't the
editors of choice by any means.  And if you want to attract converts from the
Evil Empire, you can't be expecting them to know the cryptic commands of vi
on day one.  Nano, while not as powerful as the others, is very simple to use
- allowing you to actually make it through an install to the point where you
can get something better working.

Just my .02c on the matter.

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Re: fixing fstab

Iain Buchanan
In reply to this post by Nick Rout
On Wed, 2005-11-16 at 14:31 +1300, Nick Rout wrote:
> On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 17:13:15 -0800 (PST)
> Bryan Whitehead wrote:
>
> > I still don't understand the logic of not having vi installed by default
> > over nano...
>
> easier for newbies.

since when was gentoo a "newbie distro"?

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Re: fixing fstab

Nick Rout

On Wed, 16 Nov 2005 11:36:44 +0930
Iain Buchanan wrote:

> On Wed, 2005-11-16 at 14:31 +1300, Nick Rout wrote:
> > On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 17:13:15 -0800 (PST)
> > Bryan Whitehead wrote:
> >
> > > I still don't understand the logic of not having vi installed by default
> > > over nano...
> >
> > easier for newbies.
>
> since when was gentoo a "newbie distro"?

I am quite experienced with linux, used it a long time. never got
completely to grips with vi. Should gentoo be a mystery to me too just
because of an editor issue?

Frankly I don't like nano much either, but at least I don't need any
resource other than is what on the screen in front of me to understand
it.


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Re: fixing fstab

ellotheth rimmwen
On 11/15/05, Nick Rout <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I am quite experienced with linux, used it a long time. never got
> completely to grips with vi. Should gentoo be a mystery to me too just
> because of an editor issue?

Heh, and on the other hand, I'm hardly a Linux guru (I did a stage 2
out of sheer ignorance), but I emerged vi in the middle of the
installation because I just couLDN'T TAKE ANY MORE.

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Re: fixing fstab

Iain Buchanan
On Tue, 2005-11-15 at 23:00 -0500, ellotheth rimmwen wrote:
>  because I just couLDN'T TAKE ANY MORE.

And you're obviously using vi to compose mail :) Still haven't figured
out the backspace and caps?  Now, if you were using emacs, from the end
of the line you could just ctrl-leftarrow, ctrl-leftarrow,
ctrl-leftarrow, ctrl-leftarrow, ctrl-leftarrow, alt-l, alt-l, alt-l,
alt-l, alt-l.  Could it be any simpler?!!
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