going from systemd to udev

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going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?

I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming faxes and now these emails are empty.

It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(

--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Daniel Campbell-2
On 02/04/2014 01:58 PM, Joseph wrote:
> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>
> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
> sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
> faxes and now these emails are empty.
> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>

systemd and udev are part of the same project, so I believe what you
meant was switching from systemd to OpenRC. I've not made such a switch,
but if you remember the steps you took, you can generally just reverse
them. That is, emerge openrc again, change the kernel line in GRUB to
point to regular init instead of systemd's init, reboot, and things
*should* fall into place.

USB drives mounting as root sounds like a udev thing rather than a
systemd thing, and switching to OpenRC for your init won't fix it afaik.
For the devices that you need this behavior for, it might be worth
looking into writing some udev rules. You can get a start by consulting
`lsusb` output and Googling for 'udev rules' to get a wide variety of
guides for writing udev rules. Despite the recent changes to udev by the
systemd team, udev still functions mostly the same and most guides will
be accurate.

I hope this helps!

~Daniel

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Re: going from systemd to udev

allan gottlieb
On Tue, Feb 04 2014, Daniel Campbell wrote:

> On 02/04/2014 01:58 PM, Joseph wrote:
>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>
>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
>> sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>
>
> systemd and udev are part of the same project, so I believe what you
> meant was switching from systemd to OpenRC. I've not made such a switch,
> but if you remember the steps you took, you can generally just reverse
> them. That is, emerge openrc again, change the kernel line in GRUB to
> point to regular init instead of systemd's init, reboot, and things
> *should* fall into place.
>
> USB drives mounting as root sounds like a udev thing rather than a
> systemd thing, and switching to OpenRC for your init won't fix it afaik.
> For the devices that you need this behavior for, it might be worth
> looking into writing some udev rules. You can get a start by consulting
> `lsusb` output and Googling for 'udev rules' to get a wide variety of
> guides for writing udev rules. Despite the recent changes to udev by the
> systemd team, udev still functions mostly the same and most guides will
> be accurate.
>
> I hope this helps!
>
> ~Daniel

There are changes in USE.   -systemd +consolekit
If you switched to a systemd profile, switch back.

The wiki for going from openRC --> systemd might be helpful
https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Systemd

allan

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Re: going from systemd to udev

walter s
On 02/04/2014 02:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:

> On Tue, Feb 04 2014, Daniel Campbell wrote:
>
>> On 02/04/2014 01:58 PM, Joseph wrote:
>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>>
>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
>>> sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>>
>>
>> systemd and udev are part of the same project, so I believe what you
>> meant was switching from systemd to OpenRC. I've not made such a switch,
>> but if you remember the steps you took, you can generally just reverse
>> them. That is, emerge openrc again, change the kernel line in GRUB to
>> point to regular init instead of systemd's init, reboot, and things
>> *should* fall into place.
>>
>> USB drives mounting as root sounds like a udev thing rather than a
>> systemd thing, and switching to OpenRC for your init won't fix it afaik.
>> For the devices that you need this behavior for, it might be worth
>> looking into writing some udev rules. You can get a start by consulting
>> `lsusb` output and Googling for 'udev rules' to get a wide variety of
>> guides for writing udev rules. Despite the recent changes to udev by the
>> systemd team, udev still functions mostly the same and most guides will
>> be accurate.
>>
>> I hope this helps!
>>
>> ~Daniel
>
> There are changes in USE.   -systemd +consolekit
> If you switched to a systemd profile, switch back.

I'm sure that unsetting the consolekit useflag (when I switched to systemd)
resulted in some non-MicroSoft behavior, e.g. I now need to authenticate as
root when plugging or ejecting a USB stick, and yet again when I poweroff or
reboot the machine

Being the only user of this machine, I could work up some outrage over this
new PITA -- but I've decided not to be outraged.  I pretend to be a sysadmin
and imagine how I would feel if an arbitrary user demanded the ability to
plug any arbitrary USB stick into his corporate workstation.

Well, I'm not a corporate sysadmin, and never will be, but I think I'd be
reluctant to let him do it.

Any official sysadmins out there have an infallible opinion to offer?

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés
In reply to this post by Joseph-77
On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>
> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB sick
> (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
> faxes and now these emails are empty.
> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(

If I'm not mistaken, systemd/udev doesn't mount removable devices by
default, it just notifies the system about new volume and creates
links under /dev/disk. In GNOME 3 udisks is the one doing the actual
mounting (AFAIU); with GNOME 2 it was gnome-volume-manager, etc.

What DE do you use? Are you using something like pmount?

Regards.
--
Canek Peláez Valdés
Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés
In reply to this post by walter s
On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 5:27 PM, walt <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 02/04/2014 02:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>> On Tue, Feb 04 2014, Daniel Campbell wrote:
>>
>>> On 02/04/2014 01:58 PM, Joseph wrote:
>>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>>>
>>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
>>>> sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>>>
>>>
>>> systemd and udev are part of the same project, so I believe what you
>>> meant was switching from systemd to OpenRC. I've not made such a switch,
>>> but if you remember the steps you took, you can generally just reverse
>>> them. That is, emerge openrc again, change the kernel line in GRUB to
>>> point to regular init instead of systemd's init, reboot, and things
>>> *should* fall into place.
>>>
>>> USB drives mounting as root sounds like a udev thing rather than a
>>> systemd thing, and switching to OpenRC for your init won't fix it afaik.
>>> For the devices that you need this behavior for, it might be worth
>>> looking into writing some udev rules. You can get a start by consulting
>>> `lsusb` output and Googling for 'udev rules' to get a wide variety of
>>> guides for writing udev rules. Despite the recent changes to udev by the
>>> systemd team, udev still functions mostly the same and most guides will
>>> be accurate.
>>>
>>> I hope this helps!
>>>
>>> ~Daniel
>>
>> There are changes in USE.   -systemd +consolekit
>> If you switched to a systemd profile, switch back.
>
> I'm sure that unsetting the consolekit useflag (when I switched to systemd)
> resulted in some non-MicroSoft behavior, e.g. I now need to authenticate as
> root when plugging or ejecting a USB stick, and yet again when I poweroff or
> reboot the machine

This does not happen with GNOME 3. At all. The only time I'm asked for
my root password is when I add or remove a printer, and
app-admin/system-config-printer-gnome has been doing this since the
very beginning. I'm still hoping that someone fix that thing.

> Being the only user of this machine, I could work up some outrage over this
> new PITA -- but I've decided not to be outraged.  I pretend to be a sysadmin
> and imagine how I would feel if an arbitrary user demanded the ability to
> plug any arbitrary USB stick into his corporate workstation.
>
> Well, I'm not a corporate sysadmin, and never will be, but I think I'd be
> reluctant to let him do it.
>
> Any official sysadmins out there have an infallible opinion to offer?

With GNOME+systemd (and therefore, logind), the seat0 user gets
ownership of all removable devices (except printers, see above), and
the hardware buttons (poweroff, reset, suspend, etc.) No root password
asked. Ever.

You can see your seat with loginctl; if your seat is not seat0, that's
why your password is being asked. If it's seat0, then something else
is going on. Do you have pam_systemd.so enabled in /etc/pam.d?

Regards.
--
Canek Peláez Valdés
Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
In reply to this post by Canek Peláez Valdés
On 02/04/14 18:03, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

>On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>
>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB sick
>> (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>
>If I'm not mistaken, systemd/udev doesn't mount removable devices by
>default, it just notifies the system about new volume and creates
>links under /dev/disk. In GNOME 3 udisks is the one doing the actual
>mounting (AFAIU); with GNOME 2 it was gnome-volume-manager, etc.
>
>What DE do you use? Are you using something like pmount?
>
>Regards.
>--
>Canek Peláez Valdés
>Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
>Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

I'm using XFCE
It all started to happen after I switched to systemd.  So maybe on the weekend I'll try to switch one of the machine back to udev.
I think all I need is to unmerge "systemd" and emerge "udev" without rebooting.

--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés
On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 6:24 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 02/04/14 18:03, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
>>
>> On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>>
>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
>>> sick
>>> (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>
>>
>> If I'm not mistaken, systemd/udev doesn't mount removable devices by
>> default, it just notifies the system about new volume and creates
>> links under /dev/disk. In GNOME 3 udisks is the one doing the actual
>> mounting (AFAIU); with GNOME 2 it was gnome-volume-manager, etc.
>>
>> What DE do you use? Are you using something like pmount?
>>
>> Regards.
>> --
>> Canek Peláez Valdés
>> Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
>> Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
>
>
> I'm using XFCE It all started to happen after I switched to systemd.  So
> maybe on the weekend I'll try to switch one of the machine back to udev.
> I think all I need is to unmerge "systemd" and emerge "udev" without
> rebooting.

As others have said, udev *IS* systemd. It's the same code and
configuration [1].

And if you don't reboot after uninstalling systemd (while having
booted with it), I don't think your system will stay stable for much
longer.

I see that thunar depends on gvfs, which can use udisks or
gnome-disk-utility. Which one do you have? What does portage it says
when you do:

emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs

If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to udisks.
It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used Xfce,
so I'm not certain.

Regards.

[1] http://cgit.freedesktop.org/systemd/systemd/tree/src/udev
--
Canek Peláez Valdés
Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
On 02/04/14 18:38, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

>On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 6:24 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 02/04/14 18:03, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
>>>
>>> On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>>>
>>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
>>>> sick
>>>> (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>>
>>>
>>> If I'm not mistaken, systemd/udev doesn't mount removable devices by
>>> default, it just notifies the system about new volume and creates
>>> links under /dev/disk. In GNOME 3 udisks is the one doing the actual
>>> mounting (AFAIU); with GNOME 2 it was gnome-volume-manager, etc.
>>>
>>> What DE do you use? Are you using something like pmount?
>>>
>>> Regards.
>>> --
>>> Canek Peláez Valdés
>>> Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
>>> Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
>>
>>
>> I'm using XFCE It all started to happen after I switched to systemd.  So
>> maybe on the weekend I'll try to switch one of the machine back to udev.
>> I think all I need is to unmerge "systemd" and emerge "udev" without
>> rebooting.
>
>As others have said, udev *IS* systemd. It's the same code and
>configuration [1].
>
>And if you don't reboot after uninstalling systemd (while having
>booted with it), I don't think your system will stay stable for much
>longer.
>
>I see that thunar depends on gvfs, which can use udisks or
>gnome-disk-utility. Which one do you have? What does portage it says
>when you do:
>
>emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs
>
>If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to udisks.
>It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used Xfce,
>so I'm not certain.
>
>Regards.
>
>[1] http://cgit.freedesktop.org/systemd/systemd/tree/src/udev

I have: gnome-base/gvf with "gdu" flag disabled.
and sys-fs/udisks
Installed versions:  2.1.0(2)(02:33:06 PM 12/28/2013)(gptfdisk introspection -cryptsetup -debug -selinux -systemd)

so it seems I have them both: gvfs and udisks.
Maybe I should enabled "systemd" flag in udisks since I"m using it already.

--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
In reply to this post by Canek Peláez Valdés
On 02/04/14 18:38, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

[snip]

>>
>> I'm using XFCE It all started to happen after I switched to systemd.  So
>> maybe on the weekend I'll try to switch one of the machine back to udev.
>> I think all I need is to unmerge "systemd" and emerge "udev" without
>> rebooting.
>
>As others have said, udev *IS* systemd. It's the same code and
>configuration [1].
>
>And if you don't reboot after uninstalling systemd (while having
>booted with it), I don't think your system will stay stable for much
>longer.
>
>I see that thunar depends on gvfs, which can use udisks or
>gnome-disk-utility. Which one do you have? What does portage it says
>when you do:
>
>emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs
>
>If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to udisks.
>It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used Xfce,
>so I'm not certain.

Do I need to put flag: systemd in make.conf file: USE="...
to enable it globally?

--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

poncho-3
In reply to this post by Canek Peláez Valdés
On 05.02.2014 01:10, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

> On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 5:27 PM, walt <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 02/04/2014 02:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>>> On Tue, Feb 04 2014, Daniel Campbell wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 02/04/2014 01:58 PM, Joseph wrote:
>>>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>>>>
>>>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
>>>>> sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>>>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>>>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>>>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> systemd and udev are part of the same project, so I believe what you
>>>> meant was switching from systemd to OpenRC. I've not made such a switch,
>>>> but if you remember the steps you took, you can generally just reverse
>>>> them. That is, emerge openrc again, change the kernel line in GRUB to
>>>> point to regular init instead of systemd's init, reboot, and things
>>>> *should* fall into place.
>>>>
>>>> USB drives mounting as root sounds like a udev thing rather than a
>>>> systemd thing, and switching to OpenRC for your init won't fix it afaik.
>>>> For the devices that you need this behavior for, it might be worth
>>>> looking into writing some udev rules. You can get a start by consulting
>>>> `lsusb` output and Googling for 'udev rules' to get a wide variety of
>>>> guides for writing udev rules. Despite the recent changes to udev by the
>>>> systemd team, udev still functions mostly the same and most guides will
>>>> be accurate.
>>>>
>>>> I hope this helps!
>>>>
>>>> ~Daniel
>>>
>>> There are changes in USE.   -systemd +consolekit
>>> If you switched to a systemd profile, switch back.
>>
>> I'm sure that unsetting the consolekit useflag (when I switched to systemd)
>> resulted in some non-MicroSoft behavior, e.g. I now need to authenticate as
>> root when plugging or ejecting a USB stick, and yet again when I poweroff or
>> reboot the machine
>
> This does not happen with GNOME 3. At all. The only time I'm asked for
> my root password is when I add or remove a printer, and
> app-admin/system-config-printer-gnome has been doing this since the
> very beginning. I'm still hoping that someone fix that thing.
>
>> Being the only user of this machine, I could work up some outrage over this
>> new PITA -- but I've decided not to be outraged.  I pretend to be a sysadmin
>> and imagine how I would feel if an arbitrary user demanded the ability to
>> plug any arbitrary USB stick into his corporate workstation.
>>
>> Well, I'm not a corporate sysadmin, and never will be, but I think I'd be
>> reluctant to let him do it.
>>
>> Any official sysadmins out there have an infallible opinion to offer?
>
> With GNOME+systemd (and therefore, logind), the seat0 user gets
> ownership of all removable devices (except printers, see above), and
> the hardware buttons (poweroff, reset, suspend, etc.) No root password
> asked. Ever.
>
> You can see your seat with loginctl; if your seat is not seat0, that's
> why your password is being asked. If it's seat0, then something else
> is going on. Do you have pam_systemd.so enabled in /etc/pam.d?
>
> Regards.
>

Concerning the printer permissions, see
https://bugs.gentoo.org/show_bug.cgi?id=466338

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés
In reply to this post by Joseph-77

On Feb 4, 2014 7:28 PM, "Joseph" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On 02/04/14 18:38, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
>
> [snip]
>
>>>
>>> I'm using XFCE It all started to happen after I switched to systemd.  So
>>> maybe on the weekend I'll try to switch one of the machine back to udev.
>>> I think all I need is to unmerge "systemd" and emerge "udev" without
>>> rebooting.
>>
>>
>> As others have said, udev *IS* systemd. It's the same code and
>> configuration [1].
>>
>> And if you don't reboot after uninstalling systemd (while having
>> booted with it), I don't think your system will stay stable for much
>> longer.
>>
>> I see that thunar depends on gvfs, which can use udisks or
>> gnome-disk-utility. Which one do you have? What does portage it says
>> when you do:
>>
>> emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs
>>
>> If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to udisks.
>> It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used Xfce,
>> so I'm not certain.
>
>
> Do I need to put flag: systemd in make.conf file: USE="...
> to enable it globally?

Supposedly, you should enable local flags per package in /etc/portage/package.use, but many does put it on make.conf.

Either way, if you are using systemd, you *should* set the systemd USE flag on everything, otherwise the package in question will try to use the non-systemd implementation (if any), and that will (almost surely) fail under systemd.

Regards.

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés
In reply to this post by poncho-3


On Feb 4, 2014 7:30 PM, "Poncho" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On 05.02.2014 01:10, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
> > On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 5:27 PM, walt <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >> On 02/04/2014 02:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
> >>> On Tue, Feb 04 2014, Daniel Campbell wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> On 02/04/2014 01:58 PM, Joseph wrote:
> >>>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB
> >>>>> sick (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
> >>>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
> >>>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
> >>>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> systemd and udev are part of the same project, so I believe what you
> >>>> meant was switching from systemd to OpenRC. I've not made such a switch,
> >>>> but if you remember the steps you took, you can generally just reverse
> >>>> them. That is, emerge openrc again, change the kernel line in GRUB to
> >>>> point to regular init instead of systemd's init, reboot, and things
> >>>> *should* fall into place.
> >>>>
> >>>> USB drives mounting as root sounds like a udev thing rather than a
> >>>> systemd thing, and switching to OpenRC for your init won't fix it afaik.
> >>>> For the devices that you need this behavior for, it might be worth
> >>>> looking into writing some udev rules. You can get a start by consulting
> >>>> `lsusb` output and Googling for 'udev rules' to get a wide variety of
> >>>> guides for writing udev rules. Despite the recent changes to udev by the
> >>>> systemd team, udev still functions mostly the same and most guides will
> >>>> be accurate.
> >>>>
> >>>> I hope this helps!
> >>>>
> >>>> ~Daniel
> >>>
> >>> There are changes in USE.   -systemd +consolekit
> >>> If you switched to a systemd profile, switch back.
> >>
> >> I'm sure that unsetting the consolekit useflag (when I switched to systemd)
> >> resulted in some non-MicroSoft behavior, e.g. I now need to authenticate as
> >> root when plugging or ejecting a USB stick, and yet again when I poweroff or
> >> reboot the machine
> >
> > This does not happen with GNOME 3. At all. The only time I'm asked for
> > my root password is when I add or remove a printer, and
> > app-admin/system-config-printer-gnome has been doing this since the
> > very beginning. I'm still hoping that someone fix that thing.
> >
> >> Being the only user of this machine, I could work up some outrage over this
> >> new PITA -- but I've decided not to be outraged.  I pretend to be a sysadmin
> >> and imagine how I would feel if an arbitrary user demanded the ability to
> >> plug any arbitrary USB stick into his corporate workstation.
> >>
> >> Well, I'm not a corporate sysadmin, and never will be, but I think I'd be
> >> reluctant to let him do it.
> >>
> >> Any official sysadmins out there have an infallible opinion to offer?
> >
> > With GNOME+systemd (and therefore, logind), the seat0 user gets
> > ownership of all removable devices (except printers, see above), and
> > the hardware buttons (poweroff, reset, suspend, etc.) No root password
> > asked. Ever.
> >
> > You can see your seat with loginctl; if your seat is not seat0, that's
> > why your password is being asked. If it's seat0, then something else
> > is going on. Do you have pam_systemd.so enabled in /etc/pam.d?
> >
> > Regards.
> >
>
> Concerning the printer permissions, see
> https://bugs.gentoo.org/show_bug.cgi?id=466338

Thanks, I will take a look.

Regards.

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
In reply to this post by Canek Peláez Valdés
On 02/04/14 18:03, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

>On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>
>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB sick
>> (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>
>If I'm not mistaken, systemd/udev doesn't mount removable devices by
>default, it just notifies the system about new volume and creates
>links under /dev/disk. In GNOME 3 udisks is the one doing the actual
>mounting (AFAIU); with GNOME 2 it was gnome-volume-manager, etc.
>
>What DE do you use? Are you using something like pmount?
>
>Regards.
>--
>Canek Peláez Valdés
>Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
>Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

I don't have "pmount" installed, and I'm not sure what XFCE4 is using.
How to find out?


--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés


On Feb 4, 2014 7:38 PM, "Joseph" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On 02/04/14 18:03, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
>>
>> On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Is it possible to go from "systemd" to "udev"?
>>>
>>> I don't like the way systemd works.  I have a problem with mounting USB sick
>>> (it mounts as root:root) and I can not even change the permission.
>>> I am receiving Hylafax fax transmission reports (email) on all incoming
>>> faxes and now these emails are empty.
>>> It all start happening after switching to systemd :-(
>>
>>
>> If I'm not mistaken, systemd/udev doesn't mount removable devices by
>> default, it just notifies the system about new volume and creates
>> links under /dev/disk. In GNOME 3 udisks is the one doing the actual
>> mounting (AFAIU); with GNOME 2 it was gnome-volume-manager, etc.
>>
>> What DE do you use? Are you using something like pmount?
>>
>> Regards.
>> --
>> Canek Peláez Valdés
>> Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
>> Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
>
>
> I don't have "pmount" installed, and I'm not sure what XFCE4 is using.
> How to find out?        

It's using gvfs, the problem is probably that gvfs is trying to use the non-systemd implementation (probably ConsoleKit) on a systemd machine. Re emerge everything with the systemd USE flag and it probably will solve itself.

I mentioned pmount only because we didn't know enough; now you told us that you have gvfs, and that you didn't enabled systemd support for it even when you are using systemd.

Regards.

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
In reply to this post by Canek Peláez Valdés
On 02/04/14 19:33, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

[snip]

>   >> emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs
>   >>
>   >> If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to
>   udisks.
>   >> It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used
>   Xfce,
>   >> so I'm not certain.
>   >
>   >
>   > Do I need to put flag: systemd in make.conf file: USE="...
>   > to enable it globally?
>
>   Supposedly, you should enable local flags per package in
>   /etc/portage/package.use, but many does put it on make.conf.
>
>   Either way, if you are using systemd, you *should* set the systemd USE
>   flag on everything, otherwise the package in question will try to use
>   the non-systemd implementation (if any), and that will (almost surely)
>   fail under systemd.
>
>   Regards.

After enable "systemd" flag in make.conf USE=
the following packages were rebuild:
sys-apps/busybox
sys-apps/dbus
sys-auth/pambase
sys-auth/polkit
sys-fs/udisks
sys-power/upower
gnome-base/gvfs

But now I have a BIG problem, I can not mount USB stick at all as user (only as root).
Eject doesn't work either.
       
--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Canek Peláez Valdés
On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 8:01 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 02/04/14 19:33, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
>
> [snip]
>>
>>   >> emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs
>>
>>   >>
>>   >> If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to
>>   udisks.
>>   >> It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used
>>   Xfce,
>>   >> so I'm not certain.
>>   >
>>   >
>>   > Do I need to put flag: systemd in make.conf file: USE="...
>>   > to enable it globally?
>>
>>   Supposedly, you should enable local flags per package in
>>   /etc/portage/package.use, but many does put it on make.conf.
>>
>>   Either way, if you are using systemd, you *should* set the systemd USE
>>   flag on everything, otherwise the package in question will try to use
>>   the non-systemd implementation (if any), and that will (almost surely)
>>   fail under systemd.
>>
>>   Regards.
>
>
> After enable "systemd" flag in make.conf USE=
> the following packages were rebuild:
> sys-apps/busybox
> sys-apps/dbus
> sys-auth/pambase
> sys-auth/polkit
> sys-fs/udisks
> sys-power/upower
> gnome-base/gvfs
>
> But now I have a BIG problem, I can not mount USB stick at all as user (only
> as root).
> Eject doesn't work either.

Did you rebooted?

Regards.
--
Canek Peláez Valdés
Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Joseph-77
On 02/04/14 20:06, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:

>On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 8:01 PM, Joseph <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 02/04/14 19:33, Canek Peláez Valdés wrote:
>>
>> [snip]
>>>
>>>   >> emerge -pv gnome-base/gvfs
>>>
>>>   >>
>>>   >> If you have the gdu USE flag enabled, I recommend switching to
>>>   udisks.
>>>   >> It's possible that it will fix everything, but I have never used
>>>   Xfce,
>>>   >> so I'm not certain.
>>>   >
>>>   >
>>>   > Do I need to put flag: systemd in make.conf file: USE="...
>>>   > to enable it globally?
>>>
>>>   Supposedly, you should enable local flags per package in
>>>   /etc/portage/package.use, but many does put it on make.conf.
>>>
>>>   Either way, if you are using systemd, you *should* set the systemd USE
>>>   flag on everything, otherwise the package in question will try to use
>>>   the non-systemd implementation (if any), and that will (almost surely)
>>>   fail under systemd.
>>>
>>>   Regards.
>>
>>
>> After enable "systemd" flag in make.conf USE=
>> the following packages were rebuild:
>> sys-apps/busybox
>> sys-apps/dbus
>> sys-auth/pambase
>> sys-auth/polkit
>> sys-fs/udisks
>> sys-power/upower
>> gnome-base/gvfs
>>
>> But now I have a BIG problem, I can not mount USB stick at all as user (only
>> as root).
>> Eject doesn't work either.
>
>Did you rebooted?
>
>Regards.
>--
>Canek Peláez Valdés
>Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de la Computación
>Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
>

Yes, I did.  
Should I reverse it? Remove flag "systemd" from make.conf and rebuild.


--
Joseph

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Re: going from systemd to udev

Alan McKinnon-2
In reply to this post by walter s
On 05/02/2014 01:27, walt wrote:
> Being the only user of this machine, I could work up some outrage over this
> new PITA -- but I've decided not to be outraged.  I pretend to be a sysadmin
> and imagine how I would feel if an arbitrary user demanded the ability to
> plug any arbitrary USB stick into his corporate workstation.
>
> Well, I'm not a corporate sysadmin, and never will be, but I think I'd be
> reluctant to let him do it.
>
> Any official sysadmins out there have an infallible opinion to offer?


I am a corporate sysadmin, and resisting that one is a waste of time.

"bring your own device" is all the current rage in corporate speak.
So it's The user's whole computer plus nothing of mine on the network
versus the users own USB stick plus the computer of mine on the network.
No brainer.

--
Alan McKinnon
[hidden email]


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Re: going from systemd to udev

J. Roeleveld
On Wed, February 5, 2014 07:21, Alan McKinnon wrote:

> On 05/02/2014 01:27, walt wrote:
>> Being the only user of this machine, I could work up some outrage over
>> this
>> new PITA -- but I've decided not to be outraged.  I pretend to be a
>> sysadmin
>> and imagine how I would feel if an arbitrary user demanded the ability
>> to
>> plug any arbitrary USB stick into his corporate workstation.
>>
>> Well, I'm not a corporate sysadmin, and never will be, but I think I'd
>> be
>> reluctant to let him do it.
>>
>> Any official sysadmins out there have an infallible opinion to offer?
>
>
> I am a corporate sysadmin, and resisting that one is a waste of time.
>
> "bring your own device" is all the current rage in corporate speak.
> So it's The user's whole computer plus nothing of mine on the network
> versus the users own USB stick plus the computer of mine on the network.
> No brainer.

It's this "BYOD" thing why VLANs and multiple SSIDs are becoming more
popular.
Put all those BYODs on a seperate VLAN with limited access to the
corporate infrastructure and you can still ensure the security of your own
hardware.

--
Joost


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