trying to find old kernel ebuild

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trying to find old kernel ebuild

Bill Kenworthy
Hi,

    I am trying to find the ebuild and files  for
sys-kernel/gentoo-sources-4.18.20 but as its no longer in the tree I
checked the attic but it looks like it is only cvs and no longer in use
for git.

I couldnt find gentoo sources in the server linked to from the cvs
attic. Is there an equivalent to the attic for git, or a stanza to
retrieve it?

BillK



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Re: trying to find old kernel ebuild

Arve Barsnes
On Mon, 14 Jan 2019 at 13:47, Bill Kenworthy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>     I am trying to find the ebuild and files  for
> sys-kernel/gentoo-sources-4.18.20 but as its no longer in the tree I
> checked the attic but it looks like it is only cvs and no longer in use
> for git.
>
> I couldnt find gentoo sources in the server linked to from the cvs
> attic. Is there an equivalent to the attic for git, or a stanza to
> retrieve it?

Looking at the git log should give you all the information you need.
https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/log/sys-kernel/gentoo-sources/gentoo-sources-4.18.20.ebuild

Regards,
Arve

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Re: trying to find old kernel ebuild

Rich Freeman
In reply to this post by Bill Kenworthy
On Mon, Jan 14, 2019 at 7:47 AM Bill Kenworthy <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Hi,
>
>     I am trying to find the ebuild and files  for
> sys-kernel/gentoo-sources-4.18.20 but as its no longer in the tree I
> checked the attic but it looks like it is only cvs and no longer in use
> for git.
>
> I couldnt find gentoo sources in the server linked to from the cvs
> attic. Is there an equivalent to the attic for git, or a stanza to
> retrieve it?

If you have a git checkout, then chdir to the package directory, and
run "git whatchanged ." and search for the ebuild filename in the
output to find the commit where it was removed, then go one commit
further and check out that commit.

If you want to do it on the web I'd:

1.  go to https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/
2.  Click tree
3.  Navigate to the desired package directory
4.  Hit log
5.  Search for 4.18.20 if what you are looking for isn't in the last
page, or feel free to browse the history.
6.  Click on the most recent commit of interest.
7. Find the ebuild in the commit, and click on its filename to get the
full contents of the ebuild.
8.  Click on the plain button next to the blob ID to get the raw
ebuild.  For convenience it is:
https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/plain/sys-kernel/gentoo-sources/gentoo-sources-4.18.20.ebuild?id=966dc9c8c004d79b02cb0250ecef65974164f295

If you're interested in running non-Gentoo-supported kernel series
though I'd suggest just using the upstream kernel repo directly.  Then
you have access to upstream releases when they are released, even if
that series never gets a Gentoo ebuild.

However, either way you ought to understand what you're doing.  4.18
is not supported by upstream or Gentoo.  The kernel will obviously
work the way it always did, but if there is a security update/etc you
won't get it.  If you want to avoid significant kernel changes you
should try to settle on a longterm kernel, like 4.14 or 4.19, and then
just stick with it until a more recent longterm is appropriate.  Those
get incremental stable updates for a long time.

I think Gentoo's intent is to keep stable following a longterm branch,
but there were some issues with a recent longterm that probably has
derailed this a bit.  I'm not on the kernel team so you're better off
going to them if there are questions.  If you want to not have to
worry about maintenance then you should either follow upstream or
Gentoo, and setting out on your own should only be done to bisect
issues or when you know what you're doing...

--
Rich

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Re: trying to find old kernel ebuild

Alarig Le Lay
In reply to this post by Bill Kenworthy
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Re: trying to find old kernel ebuild

Bill Kenworthy
In reply to this post by Rich Freeman
On 14/1/19 10:27 pm, Rich Freeman wrote:

> On Mon, Jan 14, 2019 at 7:47 AM Bill Kenworthy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>>     I am trying to find the ebuild and files  for
>> sys-kernel/gentoo-sources-4.18.20 but as its no longer in the tree I
>> checked the attic but it looks like it is only cvs and no longer in use
>> for git.
>>
>> I couldnt find gentoo sources in the server linked to from the cvs
>> attic. Is there an equivalent to the attic for git, or a stanza to
>> retrieve it?
> If you have a git checkout, then chdir to the package directory, and
> run "git whatchanged ." and search for the ebuild filename in the
> output to find the commit where it was removed, then go one commit
> further and check out that commit.
>
> If you want to do it on the web I'd:
>
> 1.  go to https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/
> 2.  Click tree
> 3.  Navigate to the desired package directory
> 4.  Hit log
> 5.  Search for 4.18.20 if what you are looking for isn't in the last
> page, or feel free to browse the history.
> 6.  Click on the most recent commit of interest.
> 7. Find the ebuild in the commit, and click on its filename to get the
> full contents of the ebuild.
> 8.  Click on the plain button next to the blob ID to get the raw
> ebuild.  For convenience it is:
> https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/plain/sys-kernel/gentoo-sources/gentoo-sources-4.18.20.ebuild?id=966dc9c8c004d79b02cb0250ecef65974164f295
>
> If you're interested in running non-Gentoo-supported kernel series
> though I'd suggest just using the upstream kernel repo directly.  Then
> you have access to upstream releases when they are released, even if
> that series never gets a Gentoo ebuild.
>
> However, either way you ought to understand what you're doing.  4.18
> is not supported by upstream or Gentoo.  The kernel will obviously
> work the way it always did, but if there is a security update/etc you
> won't get it.  If you want to avoid significant kernel changes you
> should try to settle on a longterm kernel, like 4.14 or 4.19, and then
> just stick with it until a more recent longterm is appropriate.  Those
> get incremental stable updates for a long time.
>
> I think Gentoo's intent is to keep stable following a longterm branch,
> but there were some issues with a recent longterm that probably has
> derailed this a bit.  I'm not on the kernel team so you're better off
> going to them if there are questions.  If you want to not have to
> worry about maintenance then you should either follow upstream or
> Gentoo, and setting out on your own should only be done to bisect
> issues or when you know what you're doing...
>
Hi Rich, unfortunately 4.18.20 is the last one that supports the ipts
patch set (surface pro4 touch screen) ... its flaky, bu the earlier ones
are even worse so going to a LT kernel isnt really useful.  I hope they
can get a 4.19 or 4.20 patch set up soon, but apparently kernel changes
have made it difficult. 4.19 without touch does work with only minor
problems, but of course with no touch screen.

BillK



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Re: trying to find old kernel ebuild

Rich Freeman
On Mon, Jan 14, 2019 at 9:46 AM Bill Kenworthy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Hi Rich, unfortunately 4.18.20 is the last one that supports the ipts
> patch set (surface pro4 touch screen) ... its flaky, bu the earlier ones
> are even worse so going to a LT kernel isnt really useful.  I hope they
> can get a 4.19 or 4.20 patch set up soon, but apparently kernel changes
> have made it difficult. 4.19 without touch does work with only minor
> problems, but of course with no touch screen.
>

I'd put that in the "you know what you're doing" category - just meant
more as advice in general.

Yeah, I had that headache for a while with amdgpu + zfs.  Last
longterm didn't support it well, and zfs takes time to catch up with
new stable releases.  So I was hopping around on stable releases and
crossing my fingers a lot until 4.19.  Fortunately amdgpu has settled
down some - it was tending to panic quite a bit six months ago.

Once 4.19 has support then you should be set - just stick with that as
long as they continue to support it with fixes/etc.  Hopefully they'll
backport improvements until it is in mainline.

--
Rich